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  • ShereeKrider 2:35 am on February 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    The Dirty Fuc*ing Hippies were right! 


     
  • ShereeKrider 10:34 pm on August 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Airforce, Army, DHS, , Federal Government, , Internment, Interpol, Marines, Navy, U.N.   

    INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS FM 3-39.40 


    PLEASE BE AWARE OF THIS INFORMATION

    WHICH IS AVAILABLE VIA THE INTERNET.  "PUBLIC INTELLIGENCE" PDF EXPLAINS IN DETAIL WHAT THE ACCOMPANYING VIDEO SEEKS TO INFORM US ABOUT.  THE PDF IS A GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT NOT SUBJECT TO PUBLIC CHANCE.

     

    https://info.publicintelligence.net/USArmy-InternmentResettlement.pdf

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zzQ0q5f5l8

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:27 pm on July 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: : Current Events, , , , First Church of Cannabis, IMPD, Indianapolis, Indy, , , News, , religious freedom, RFRA, weed   

    The Cannabiterians and the cops 


    dsc00950.jpg

    THE COPS

    Charlie Doss stood outside his house on South Rural Street and watched the cops rumble by on their motorcycles.
    “You’d think they were gettin’ ready for World War Three,” he muttered. The police presence in his neighborhood was making Charlie cranky.
    “What’s the big fuckin’ deal?” he announced.
    Roughly two dozen patrol cars and a mobile IMPD unit sat at the ready in the parking lot of the Carpenters Local Union building two blocks from the First Church of Cannabis. Officers seemed to be everywhere; on foot, on bicycles — like so many other cities in America in recent years, Indy’s police department looked less like a group of peacekeeping constables and more like an occupying force.
    IMPD was out in strength for the opening services of Bill Levin’s brainchild, the First Church of Cannabis, an “unintended consequence” of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration law. After gaining tax-exempt status from the IRS, Bill had planned his inaugural ceremony for the day the law went into effect — July 1, 2015.
    Bill had initially stated that his congregants would partake of their sacrament — weed — at the end of the service.
    Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry had responded to Bill’s intentions with a press conference. Curry expressed monumental frustration with the Indiana legislature, but made it clear IMPD would have all the plastic cuffs it needed: “Anyone caught in possession of marijuana will be subject to arrest … anyone caught giving marijuana to another individual will be subject to arrest for dealing.”
    And further, as NUVO’s Amber Stearns reported on June 26:
    Curry outlined all of the potential causes for arrest at the church service. Anyone attending the service, if marijuana is present, could be subject to arrest for probation violation or for visiting a common nuisance even if they choose not to partake in the church’s “sacrament.” Anyone who tries to drive away from the church while high is subject to arrest for operating under the influence. Any and all possible criminal code violations will be enforced. He also stressed that no minor child should be in the vicinity of the church.

    Worried about a mass bust — including those who simply might’ve shown up to sing and not smoke — Levin prohibited weed at the church for the July 1 services. 

    CONTINUE READING…

     

    City-County Councilor voices concern over city’s response to First Church of Cannabis
    Posted By Amber Stearns @AmberLStearns on Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 4:00 PM

    IMPD was present in large numbers at the inaugural service of the FIrst Church of Cannabis. - PHOTO BY ED WENCK

    Indianapolis City- County Councilor Zach Adamson issued a statement calling into question the actions of the city and specifically the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department in their response to the First Church of Cannabis.

    The church held their first service Wednesday at noon following the enactment of the state’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

    Adamson says the views expressed in his statement are his own and are not meant to reflect the sentiment of the entire council.

    Adamson’s statement reads as follows:

    Yesterday, as Hoosiers watched as several new state laws took effect, one issue of particular local interest has been a bit more high profile in the news. Specifically, The First Church of Cannabis, as they push the limits of the liberties the state says they wanted to protect.

    Sadly, more than the reaction of the state, the OVER-reaction by local authorities has been of greater disappointment. Indianapolis residents have watched over the weeks as the media wars on both side of the issue have battled it out on both mainstream and social media.

    “I’ve been very troubled by the reaction by our city and the by and large overreaction by our police chief, who actually compared this religious institution’s leader to Jim Jones. That’s a jaw-dropping comparison to a horrific crime and it is an insult to the lives that were lost in that tragedy. It is even more disappointing to see this overreaction using scarce public safety resources during a time of great need in our neighborhoods”, said City-County Councilor Zach Adamson.

    Adamson continued, “Many residents have rightfully raised concerns about the city’s inappropriate use of taxpayer resources to fund harassment of this minority religious group. After reading several media reports of selective enforcement of municipal ordinances, the undue installation of police surveillance cameras – at a time when so many of our areas hardest hit by crime don’t have such attention – and the literal recruitment of opposition protesters by the mayors IMPD chief, many fear that Chief Hite’s actions have exposed the City of Indianapolis to expensive and preventable civil liabilities for violations of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, among others.

    As our city saw with yesterday morning’s homicide on the near northwest side, we need more officers on the streets and more dollars for neighborhood policing strategies – not unwarranted harassment.”

    The Council intends to take all possible actions to give IMPD the necessary tools they need to prioritize enforcement and we hope that we can pull back this encroachment onto the religious freedom of our residents. We call on the public safety agencies to allocate the officers and cameras where our residents have, for years, been begging for them and stop this highly inappropriate use of scarce taxpayer resources. We also call on Chief Hite to issue an immediate apology for the inappropriate invoking of the Jonestown Massacre.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 7:07 am on June 26, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ADDICTION DRUG, , , ,   

    IMMEDIATELY STOP FEDERAL FUNDING for a pharmaceutical drug to treat "MARIJUANA ADDICTION". THIS IS PREPOSTEROUS! 


     

    1021495_1392179425.8185

    The Washington Times reported on 6/26/15 that the Federal Government is "fast tracking" Pharma research for a Marijuana addiction drug. The research gets $3 million grant as Obama encourages legalization of Cannabis.

    This is just too much! We do not need a "drug" to detoxify us from Cannabis! We need more Hemp and Cannabis Oil for Medical use,

    Stop the funding effective immediately and give that $3 Million to a better cause.

    Fact: GW Pharma has concluded that "Cannabis is not addictive" according to their ad for SATIVEX (which has not been approved for marketing in the U.S. as of yet — And SHOULD BE!). It additionally states that it does not appear to have withdrawal effects when stopped suddenly"…

    Stop the INSANITY NOW! Stop the funding for an addiction drug for Cannabis!

    Published Date: Jun 26, 2015

    Issues: Civil Rights and Liberties, Disabilities, Health Care

     

    https://petitions.whitehouse.gov//petition/immediately-stop-federal-funding-pharmaceutical-drug-treat-marijuana-addiction-preposterous

     

    PLEASE SIGN PETITION ABOVE!!!

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:29 am on June 25, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: American Medical Association, , ,   

    Marijuana is medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association concludes 


    Posted on June 23, 2015 at 10:06 am by David Downs in featured, Health, Science

    li-620-marijuanagrow

    Marijuana is one hundred percent a form of medicine, researchers conclude in a bombshell series of reports released today by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Cannabis — which has been used medicinally for thousands of years — reduces nausea, and vomiting, and pain, as well as spasticity, a panel of researchers conclude, after reviewing a total of 79 trials.

    “Use of marijuana for chronic pain, neuropathic pain, and spasticity due to multiple sclerosis is supported by high-quality evidence,” one of the reports found.

    Researchers bemoaned the lack of high-quality trials of marijuana. That situation that can be laid at the feet of cannabis prohibition. The federal government maintains cannabis is a highly dangerous drug with no medical use. Researchers must cut through more red tape to research a pot plant than any other substance on the planet, doctors say.

    However, this week, the federal government slightly reduced the regulatory hurdles to study cannabis — down from eight layers of review, to seven.

    More than 750,000 Americans will be arrested for cannabis this year.

    The Obama administration has spent an estimated $300 million interfering with state medical marijuana programs and patients, including arresting and prosecuting patients and caregivers. Thirty-five states have medical cannabis laws, and some members of Congress are working to de-fund federal attacks on medical marijuana.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:33 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AstraZeneca, Medical Cannabis Act, Merck, Pennsylvania, , Pfizer, Rep Matt Baker Pennsylvania Traitor, Rep. Matt Baker, Rich Alloway, Sen. Mike Folmer, Senate Bill 3   

    Big pharma backs both sides in Pennsylvania marijuana debate 


    Written by Mark Walters, Evening Sun | Jun 22, 2015 1:15 PM

    marijuana_fullplant.jpg

     

    The Medical Cannabis Act, Senate Bill 3, was referred to the Health Committee last month. Introduced in January by Sen. Mike Folmer, R-Lebanon County, the bill cleared the Senate by a 40-7 vote last month.

    (Harrisburg) — A Pennsylvania representative who has said he won’t bring a medical marijuana bill up for a vote has become a target of marijuana activists on social media who say his opposition is being purchased by pharmaceutical companies.

    But state Rep. Matt Baker, R-Tioga County, who chairs the House Health Committee, said in an email that he has never spoken with a pharmaceutical company about marijuana.

    The Medical Cannabis Act, Senate Bill 3, was referred to the Health Committee last month. Introduced in January by Sen. Mike Folmer, R-Lebanon County, the bill cleared the Senate by a 40-7 vote last month.

    Baker’s campaign received $3,000 from political action committees for pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, Merck and AstraZeneca in 2014. In 2012, AstraZeneca gave Baker’s campaign $5,000. The same committees, however, paid collectively more money to state lawmakers who voted for S.B. 3, according to the committees’ online reports.

    A Facebook group called "Rep Matt Baker Pennsylvania Traitor" had 943 likes as of June 18 and contains Internet memes that lambast the politician for receiving money from pharmaceutical companies and their political action committees.

    "This page is about raising awareness about PA Rep Matt Baker, his ties to the pharmaceutical companies that pay for his campaigns, who he answers to," according to the group. One post by the group states that Baker received nearly $23,000 from one company in one year.

    Questions surrounding his stance on medical marijuana being purchased are false accusations and a propaganda tactic of radical marijuana activists, Baker wrote in his email.

    "I have always opposed legalizing marijuana as it is a federally-scheduled illegal drug as defined by federal law that has no medical value," said Baker, who has served in the House since 1993.

    Friends of Rich Alloway, a campaign group for Sen. Rich Alloway, R-Chambersburg, received $1,500 from Merck in 2014, according to the committee’s website. Alloway voted in favor of S.B. 3.

    "Candidates for public office receive contributions from political action committees and individuals for a variety of reasons," Alloway wrote in an email. "I believe that those who choose to donate to my campaign do so because they believe in me and the principles that I fight for in Harrisburg."

    When a person or group finds themselves disagreeing with a legislator’s position, they look for justification, Alloway explained in his email. That search, he said, can result in accusing a donor of influencing the legislator’s decision, even though the legislator may simply disagree with a constituent on a particular issue.

    Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery County, said he has never felt Baker was bought by the pharmaceutical industry. While he thinks it is misguided, Leach said he believes Baker’s opposition to medical marijuana is sincere.

    Leach, who voted for S.B. 3, received $250 from Pfizer in 2014. The pharmaceutical company gave $1,000 to Baker last year, while also paying nearly $9,000 to senators who voted in favor of S.B. 3.

    Contact Mark Walters at 717-771-2032.

    Medical marijuana opponent receives threats at Capitol office

    In addition to social media attacks, state Rep. Matt Baker, R-Tioga County, has also become the subject of threats as a result of his opposition to medical marijuana legislation in the committee he chairs.

    One uniformed officer had to be present in Baker’s office at the Capitol’s Ryan Building on June 1 during a scheduled medical marijuana rally, said Troy Thompson, a spokesman for the state’s Department of General Services, which oversees the Capitol Police.

    Capitol Police received a call from someone who works in Baker’s office, expressing safety concerns, said Thompson, who was not able to provide further details on the threat. A secretary at Baker’s Harrisburg office could not comment on the threat, deferring to Baker.

    Baker said he receives daily phone calls and emails expressing animus and vitriol over his opposition to legalizing marijuana. Verbal and written threats are being closely examined as well as occasional efforts by some that he said could be viewed as harassment and stalking.

    Public policy should have a respectful level of communication and civility, Baker said.

    "Attempts to bully and intimidate anyone in public service that has ideological differences of opinion only creates a disservice to the bedrock principles of democracy, good government and the spirit of civility," Baker wrote in his email.

    Contact Mark Walters at 717-771-2032.

    About the political contributions

    Pfizer’s political action committee paid $2.67 million to state and federal candidates nationwide from January 2013 to December 2014.

    "We contribute to politicians on both sides of the aisle who deal with decisions important to our company, including innovation and access to medicines. We support government officials and candidates who work toward preserving and furthering innovation and expanding access to medicines; those are the two guiding principles for us in considering political donations."

    — Sharon Castillo, media relations for Pfizer

    Merck paid $103,250 to state and federal political campaigns in Pennsylvania in 2014, according to its political contributions report.

    Merck is committed to participating constructively and responsibly in the political process, which includes providing support through the nonpartisan Merck political action committee (PAC). The PAC supports legislators from both major parties who understand and appreciate the work we do to discover and develop medicines and to make them available to the patients who need them.

    — Lainie Keller, director of Merck’s global communications

    Political contributions by candidates’ votes on Pennsylvania’s Medical Cannabis Act

    Pfizer contributions to Senators from Jan. 2013 to Dec. 2014

    Yeas

    Sen. Jacob Corman, R, $2,000

    Sen. Jay Costa, D, $1,000

    Sen. Andrew Dinniman, D, $1,850

    Sen. Vincent Hughes, D, $1,000

    Sen. Shirley Kitchen, D, $500

    Sen. Daylin Leach, D, $250

    Sen. Robert Mensch, R, $1,000

    Sen. Dominic Pileggi, R, $2,000

    Sen. John Rafferty, R $1,000

    Sen. Joseph Scarnati, R, $2,000

    Sen. Matthew Smith, D, $1,000

    Sen. Kim Ward, R, $1,000

    Sen. Donald White, R, $1,000

    Sen. Rob Teplitz, D, $250

    Nays

    Sen. Patricia Vance, R, $1,000

    Sen. Scott Hutchinson, R, $250

    No vote

    Sen. Stewart Greenleaf, R, $500

    Pfizer gave $1,000 to Rep. Matt Baker in 2014

    Merck contributions to pa Senators Jan. to Dec. 2014

    Yeas

    Costa for State Senate $1,000

    Friends of Andy Dinniman $1,500

    Citizens for Hughes $1,650

    Friends of Bob Mensch Committee $1,500

    Friends of Chuck McIlhinney $1,000

    Friends of Dominic Pileggi $5,000

    Friends of Rich Alloway $1,500

    Friends of Jake Corman $1,500

    Friends of Don White $1,200

    Friends of John Gordner $1,500

    Rafferty for Senate $1,500

    Tomlinson for State Senate $1,000

    Nays

    Elisabeth Baker for Senate $1,000

    Voters to Elect Vance $2,500

    No vote

    Citizens for Browne $500

    Citizens for Greenleaf $1,000

    Merck gave Citizens to Elect Matt Baker $1,500 in 2014

    AstraZeneca contributions to Senators for 2012

    Yeas

    Friends of Chuck McIlhinney $2,000

    Jay Costa Jr. for State Senate $2,000

    Friends of Jake Corman $3,000

    Friends of Joseph Scarnati $5,000

    Friends of Dominic Pileggi $5,000

    Nays

    Voters to Elect Patricia Vance $3,000

    AstraZeneca gave $3,000 to People to Elect Matt Baker in 2012

    More…

    Medical marijuana: Treatment, oil could reduce kids’ epileptic seizures, but it remains illegal in Pa.

    Medical marijuana bill clears Pa. Senate

    Gov. Tom Wolf meets with parents who want medical marijuana legalized for their kids

    Montel Williams lobbying for medical marijuana in Pennsylvania


    This article comes to us through a partnership between the Evening Sun and WITF.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:24 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , joints, ,   


    Man Serving 13 Years For Possessing Marijuana Two Joints Is Denied Clemency

    Posted by Johnny Green at 7:30 AM on June 22, 2015 Ending Marijuana Prohibition

    marijuana cone joint

    According to at least one reputable study, alcohol is 114 times more harmful than marijuana. Marijuana is also safer than tobacco and pharmaceuticals, both of which are legal. Knowing that, why does Louisiana have such harsh marijuana laws? A man is serving a 13 year sentence for possessing two marijuana joints in Louisiana. That’s right, a jail bed is being reserved for 13 years for a person who possessed two joints. There are pedophiles that serve less time than that, but sadly, that’s how the State of Louisiana treats marijuana.

    One would think that a Governor would learn of this colossal waste of taxpayer dollars and would step up and grant clemency. However, Louisiana’s Governor Bobby Jindal had the opportunity to do just that, but refused to do so. Per Anthony Papa’s article on Alternet:

    Bernard Noble, an individual serving 13 years for possessing two marijuana joints applied for clemency and was recently denied. The reason behind the denial was he had not yet served 10 years in prison. Bernard’s sentence is a prime example of the draconian nature of the marijuana laws in many states across the country. In stark contrast to Louisiana, many states have decriminalized possession of marijuana for personal use, with the offense being punishable by a fine and with no threat of jail time.

    This is truly a case of injustice and the vehicle of clemency is totally appropriate here. But for some reason Gov. Jindal and his administration refuses to show compassion and follow the recent lead of President Obama who granted clemency to twenty two prisoners this March.

    No one should serve even one minute in a jail cell for marijuana, let alone 13 years. How is this man such a danger to society that he needs to lose his freedom for so long? In Oregon, where I live, I’ll be able to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana starting next week. So why is Louisiana so far behind on the times? I don’t think I could ever live in Louisiana as a result of their ultra-harsh marijuana laws, or even visit for that matter, no matter how beautiful the state is.

    Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

    About Johnny Green

    Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:12 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dish Network, , , random drug testing,   

    The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work. 


     

     

    pee-cup

     

    The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work. The employee, Brandon Coats, was fired in 2010 when he failed a random drug test.

    Needless to say, this was not a popular decision among marijuana legalization activists. In his appeal, Coats claimed that Colorado labor laws legitimized his use of marijuana, making his firing illegal under those same laws. The court’s ruling held that the term “lawful activity” must be considered in both a federal and a state legal context. Because marijuana use remains illegal under federal law and marijuana itself is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, the fact that both the Congress and the Obama administration’s Justice Department have signaled that enforcement will be both lightly funded and lightly enforced does not supersede the law. Under federal law, marijuana is a dangerous and illegal drug and that is the end of the story, regardless of the feds’ “wink-wink-nod-nod” approach.

    At the Brookings Institution’s Fixgov blog, managing editor John Hudak noted:

    Federal efforts have limited funding for the use of enforcing medical marijuana laws (Congress) or use prosecutorial discretion to limit the enforcement of marijuana laws (Department of Justice). However, those moves do not resolve the serious disconnects in the law that extend far beyond a medical marijuana patient fearing prosecution. Inconsistencies between state and federal marijuana laws extend to issues of employment, housing, banking, property rights, and a variety of other areas

    We have noted before that the lack of a federal law — which only Congress can pass — raises any number of obstacles for companies in the marijuana industry. Dispensaries and growers cannot find bankers willing to take their cash deposits, and even a state government is having difficulty finding a willing bank. With almost half the states having approved the use of medical marijuana, perhaps it is time for Congress to fix a system that is truly broken.

    ALSO READ: The 10 Largest Marijuana Companies

    Read more: Congress Deserves Blame for Colorado Ruling Against Medical Marijuana – 24/7 Wall St. http://247wallst.com/consumer-products/2015/06/22/congress-deserves-blame-for-colorado-ruling-against-medical-marijuana/#ixzz3dpMMqgIa
    Follow us: @247wallst on Twitter | 247wallst on Facebook

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:04 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Criminal, , MaryJane, Newark Airport, NJ,   

    Man hid marijuana in ‘Mary Jane’ candy wrappers at airport: cops 


    By Philip Messing and Chris Perez

    June 22, 2015 | 2:36pm

     

    Embedded image permalink

     

    This dope must of been high on his own supply.

    A passenger at Newark Airport tried to sneak a stash of marijuana past the TSA — disguising it in Mary Jane candy wrappers, authorities said.

    Gregory Murphy’s “bad trip” started Friday at around 5pm when he heard his name being paged over the loudspeakers as he prepared to board a plane at Gate 85, according to Port Authority police.

    The 49-year-old Toms River, N.J. resident was confronted by TSA officers after they discovered Zig-Zag rolling papers and “a green leafy vegetation” inside of his checked luggage.

    Murphy later admitted to Port Authority police that the greens — which was wrapped in seven Mary Jane candy wrappers and concealed in a plastic zip-lock baggie — was in fact marijuana and that it and the rolling papers belonged to him, authorities said.

    Murphy was arrested and issued summonses for possession of marijuana under 50 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. He has been released and is due in court on July 7th.

     

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:26 am on June 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: anti-prohibition, , , Frankfort KY, , , , , , Pot heard around the world,   

    "Pot Heard Around the World" 


     

    FRANKFORT – Hoping to end the prohibition against hemp and cannabis, a group traveling the United States will rally today at the Capitol as part of their

    "Pot Heard Around the World" campaign.

    A nationwide campaign to raise awareness and educate Americans about the numerous uses for hemp and cannabis, the "End Of Prohibition Capitol Tour" started bringing local pro-hemp and cannabis organizations together in the beginning of June at capitols across the country.

    From Georgia, Kentucky to Kansas the tour members are working to propel cannabis and hemp legislation forward in 10 state capital cities in a 17-day Southeast U.S. tour.

    Working with doctors, patients, politicians and business owners the goal is the establishment of a responsible, safe industry.

    A news conference will take place in the Capitol Rotunda from 3-4 p.m. today with a rally to follow from 4-5:30 p.m.

    This isn’t a typical pep rally for pot, but campaign member, COO and co-founder for the campaign Nashville Rizzi said the campaign helps educate people about the rules and regulations of opening businesses where cannabis and hemp is legal.

    "We do a lot of bringing different local organizations together that may be working toward the same goals," Rizzi said.

    "Some people support medical marijuana or hemp legislation. We raise awareness, provide a place to introduce those groups to each other and strengthen support in the area."

    Jaime Montalvo, president of the nonprofit Kentuckians for Medical Marijuana, isn’t a stranger to legislators at the Capitol as he has lobbied for medical marijuana legislation in Kentucky for several years.

    He will attend the event today with three other patients.

    After going through a gauntlet of steroids, muscle relaxers, chemotherapy, interferon injections and opiates to manage his multiple sclerosis, Montalvo found using marijuana less debilitating than the side effects of his prescription medications.

    Montalvo advocated during the 2015 legislative session for the Cannabis Compassion Act which would have made Kentucky the 24th state in the U.S. with Washington D.C. to legalize medicinal marijuana.

    When asked why he is an advocate and why is he going to the rally, Montalvo said it is for others who can’t.

    "We do this for those patients who are far too sick to travel across the state, those who fear the stigma, or those who fear being labeled a criminal for doing what they have to do for a better quality of life," Montalvo said.

    "We’ve seen far too much pain and suffering to walk away from this fight and allow our legislators to do nothing. We know the relief it can provide to the sick and disabled patients of Kentucky."

     

    SOURCE:

    EVENT INFO:

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:48 am on June 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Golden Crescent, Laos, Myanmar, Opium, , Taliban, Thailand, UNODC, World Drug Report   

    The Golden Triangle was recently replaced as the world’s dominant opium producer by a new regional power known as the Golden Crescent, 


    title=

    Asia’s opium hubs

    The opiates that addicts swallow, snort and inject often begin their journey to India from the Golden Triangle and the Golden Crescent. The former is Southeast Asia’s primary hub for opium cultivation. Located along the Mekong river, where the borders of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand converge, the illicit trade thrives — exceeding $16.3 billion per year, according to a 2014 UN report. Though eradication efforts in the late ’90s and early 2000s caused the area’s opium cultivation to decline, it began surging again in 2006, partly because improvements in transportation made it easier to move the drug from place to place.

    The Golden Triangle is currently the world’s second-largest opium producer. A 2014 report by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimated the region’s opiate poppy cultivation rose to 63,800 hectares last year, compared with 61,200 hectares in 2013, nearly triple the amount harvested in 2006. Myanmar is the region’s leading opium cultivator.

    Poverty and a lack of economic opportunity fuel illicit opium farming throughout the Golden Triangle, say researchers. In one survey in Burma, village farmers said they cultivated opium poppy just to provide for basic essentials such as food, education and housing. Researchers say economic development in these areas may be the best way to prevent opium growing.

    The Golden Triangle was recently replaced as the world’s dominant opium producer by a new regional power known as the Golden Crescent, an area comprising Afghanistan and Pakistan. Afghanistan is the world’s largest opium producer and Pakistan primarily serves as an illicit drug trafficking route.

    A 2014 World Drug Report said war-torn Afghanistan accounted for 90 per cent of global opium production. In 2013, the country cultivated an estimated 5,500 tons of oven-dried opium, which translates into roughly four per cent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. Further, the already substantial opium cultivation area is growing. According to the report, the farming area increased by 36 per cent from 154,000 hectares in 2012 to 209,000 hectares in 2013. This uptick in Afghanistan’s opium cultivation continues despite the fact that the USA has invested more than seven billion dollars to combat the issue. A 2014 report from the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction described how the country’s opium cultivation was at an all-time high, despite more than a decade of US-led counter-narcotics efforts.

    Afghanistan’s illicit opium production and trafficking is a multibillion-dollar industry where the Taliban-funded terrorist organisations reap the most profit. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that in 2009 the Afghan Taliban earned around $155 million from the illicit opium trade, while Afghan drug traffickers acquired $2.2 billion — a grim reminder of how drugs fuel crime and terrorism as well as addiction.

    Read more at http://www.thestatesman.com/news/supplements/asia-s-opium-hubs/67888.html#vzM0UJoVOcxbDmA7.99

     
  • ShereeKrider 1:56 am on June 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Asa, Equal Access Amendment, Rohrabacher Farr Amendment, Rohrabacher Farr Medical Marijuana Amendment Americans for Safe Access Cjs CARERS Act Marijuana Marijuana Medical Marijuana, Safe Access, Veterans   

    Patients Are Relying on Congress to Reauthorize the Rohrabacher-Farr Medical Marijuana Amendment 


    Steph Sherer Become a fan

    Executive Director, Americans for Safe Access

    Today, the U.S. House of Representatives is expected to take part in a “marijuana vote-a-rama” of sorts, with several amendments to dealing with marijuana to be offered on the floor during the FY2016 Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations Bill. The amendments offered will cover topics from hemp and cannabidiol (CBD) to protection of state adult-use laws. Not to be lost in the shuffle is the vote to reauthorize the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment, which stipulates that the Department of Justice is not to spend any funds inferring with lawful state medical marijuana conduct. Patients, such as 15-year old Crohn’s patient/Colorado refugee Coltyn Turner, need the protection that a reauthorized Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment would continue to offer.

    The amendment was originally passed the House in May 2014, 219-189, with a strong bipartisan showing of 49 Republicans joining 170 Democrats. Later in December, Senator Mikulski helped ensure the bill remained in the final CRomnibus bill that President Obama signed into law. While its passage marked the first time since Congress approved a medical marijuana reform since designating marijuana in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, momentum for additional medical marijuana reforms grown substantially in the past 12 months with introduction of the CARERS Act in both chambers and the passage of the Veterans Equal Access Amendment offered by Senators Daines (R-MT) and Merkley (D-OR) in Senate Appropriations Committee last month.

    Once again the amendment showing strong bipartisan support out of the gate, with 6 Republican, and 6 Democrat cosponsors lending their name to this year’s version: Rohrabacher (R-CA), Farr (D-CA), Ribble (R-WI), Lee (D-CA), Massie (R-KY), Blumenauer (D-OR), Heck (R-NV), Cohen (D-TN), Young (R-AK) Polis (D-CO), McClintock (R-CA), Titus (D-NV). The number of states listed on the amendment has jumped from 32 to 39, with New York, North Carolina,Virginia, Georgia, Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana becoming the latest states to be added to the list. This now means that about 85% of the U.S. population now lives somewhere with some sort of medical marijuana patient protection. Patients like Coltyn cannot afford to wait for the federal government to play catch-up and be denied access to their medicine, and in fact, they won’t wait, as Coltyn has said ““I’d rather be illegally alive than legally dead.” With an estimated 2.4 million medical marijuana patients as of October 2014 who are being “illegally healed” in the eyes of the Department of Justice who makes no internal distinction between medical and non-medical marijuana use, the protections afforded by the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment are needed now more than ever.

    During the floor debate last year, many of the amendment cosponsors spoke in favor of the amendment, thereby establishing the legislative intent of the amendment. From their words as well as the words of the amendment’s opponents, it was clear that the intent of the amendment was to prevent the Dept. of Justice from interfering with with state legal medical marijuana conduct. As Rep. Farr put it:

    “This is essentially saying, look, if you are following State law, you are a legal resident doing your business under State law, the Feds just can’t come in and bust you and bust the doctors and bust the patient. It is more than half the States. So you don’t have to have any opinion about the value of marijuana. This doesn’t change any laws. This doesn’t affect one law, just lists the States that have already legalized it only for medical purposes, only medical purposes, and says, Federal Government, in those States, in those places, you can’t bust people. It seems to me a practical, reasonable amendment in this time and age.”

    In practical terms, it is still hard to measure the true effectiveness of the amendment, but there has been an appreciable decrease in the amount of federal interference with state-legal medical marijuana conduct. This is not to say that DOJ is being in full compliance or is even being transparent about how it has been complying with the spending restriction. While DEA raids of state-legal facilities are no longer the regular occurrence they once were, raids and their subsequent prosecutions are still continuing, even in the absence of proof that state laws were being violated, such as the Kettle Falls Five case in Washington State. While Reps. Rohrabacher and Farr have sought answers from DOJ on why this kind of interference is continuing to take place, the Department has largely sidestepped the issue, offering a terse quasi-explanation in the L.A. Times, but little else. But as Rep. Farr responded in a tweet, “@TheJusticeDept lawyers can try to parse words but Congress was clear: Stop wasting funds/resources prosecuting patients!”

    We couldn’t say it better ourselves, but it’s worth repeating, it is a waste of taxpayer funds to prosecute state-legal medical marijuana patients. To further reiterate Rep. Farr, passage of the amendment sends a strong signal to DOJ that interfering with lawful state medical marijuana conduct goes against the sense of Congress. This sense is shared by over 85% of Americans who believe that patients should have safe and legal access to medical marijuana programs under the recommendation of a physician. The health of patients like Coltyn depends on the federal government not interfering with state medical marijuana laws (his self-produced PSA underscores the reason why it’s important). Supporting this medical marijuana amendment is not only compassionate, but also fiscally pragmatic and politically safe. This vote should be a no-brainer for conservatives and liberals alike who want to keep big government out of the doctor’s office. Take action and ask your U.S. Representative to VOTE AYE on the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment.

    Follow Steph Sherer on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/safeaccess

    More:

    Rohrabacher Farr Medical Marijuana Amendment Americans for Safe Access Cjs CARERS Act Marijuana Marijuana Medical Marijuana Rohrabacher Farr Amendment Asa Safe Access Veterans Equal Access Amendment

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:04 pm on May 26, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: chemistry professor, DEA labs, Dr. Winston Corrigan, liquid Lysergic acid diethylamide, LSD or Acid, Minnesota, missing, University of Minnesota, Warrington County   

    Scientist Missing for over 30 years Found Living Inside Secret LSD Drug Lab Hidden in Basement. 


    May 17th, 2015 | by Dr. Chauncey Siemens

     

    A Couple from Cottage Grove, Minnesota discovered a man living inside a secret laboratory inside their basement.  On Friday, May 15th 2015 officers with the Warrington County Sheriffs Office went to the Morgan family’s home after receiving a call reporting a possible break in.  When the officers pulled up they saw the Morgan Family standing by the road.

    “They ran up to us and said they heard a man shouting inside their basement and that’s when they called it in to 911” Said Captain Bruce Normans with the Warrington County Sheriff’s Office.

    Officers say that they could hear the man yelling in the basement the moment they entered the Morgan’s home.  But when they moved cautiously into the basement they saw nothing.  However they could hear banging sounds coming from behind the northern wall of the Morgan family’s basement, specifically echoing from behind a large storage cabinet.

    “It was a very odd situation.  We assumed the possibility that a vagrant may have been trapped behind the cabinet and needed help” Officer Jim Catelli told Channel 6 news.

    When the Officers moved the large metal cabinet they uncovered an entry way to a large hidden room in the basement.  The room was full of various science equipment along with a terrified, elderly man.  The 83 year old man was identified as Dr. Winston Corrigan, a chemistry professor from the University of Minnesota who went missing in the fall of 1984 and was a previous resident of the home.

    “He had clearly been living down there for a long time and had suffered severe psychological trauma.. probably from not socializing with anyone for a while…or from ingesting a lot of the drugs…  I don’t know if he had been living down there since the 80’s but I wouldn’t doubt it” Said EMT personnel Landon Choler.

    Missing LSD Scientist Found

    Dr. Winston is currently being held at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis for observation.  He will eventually be sent to the state psychiatric ward in Prairie Hills Clinic where he will undergo a psychiatric evaluation to determine the extent of any psychological damage and possibly reintroduced to modern society.

    “I just can’t believe it….it’s just so odd.  The family that used to live there moved because they said the house was haunted so I guess that makes sense now.” Said a neighbor who had lived next door for 33 years.

    The Police recovered over $500,000 worth of lab equipment stolen from the University, along with 3 hand guns, an assault rifle, 50 years’ worth of military grade rations and twelve 55 gallon barrels (including three almost empty barrels) of what DEA labs have identified as pure liquid Lysergic acid diethylamide, a powerful hallucinogenic drug more commonly known as the street name LSD or Acid.

    It is not yet known if or when Dr. Winston will be convicted of any crime.

    CONTINUE READING….

     
  • ShereeKrider 5:11 am on May 26, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Cannabis Church, Church of Cannabis, ,   

    RFRA and Church of Cannabis: Partake or bust? 


    -031_levin.JPG_20150520.jpg

     

    J&C readers 12:14 p.m. EDT May 22, 2015

    Question: Bill Levin, an Indianapolis resident, said he plans to hold the first services of his newly created, marijuana-devoted First Church of Cannabis on July 1, the day Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act goes into effect, to test the new law. How should police and the state handle the situation?

    • They should ignore it. The war on (some) drugs has been an unqualified failure, needlessly destroying countless lives and trashing the precepts of our Constitution. Considering that the original federal RFRA was passed to protect the religious use of peyote, I think this is a perfect response.

    Rob Keeney

    Flora

    • Arrest him, and let him try his defense. I assume that’s what he’s expecting. Surely he’s not as stupid as the people who attacked RFRA as if it gave carte blanche.

    Roger Bennett

    Lafayette

    • This is why we have the Establishment Clause: the minute you start getting the government mucking around with religion — as RFRA does — you get into all sorts of nasty corners, like this one. The law is pretty clear the state cannot interfere with their religious behavior, so this this is an example of "hoist on one’s own petard" in action.

    Brian Capouch

    Monon

    • Presumably he will be supported by all Christians who supported the law in the first place. The police should go investigate real crimes. Be careful what you wish for, Christians, you might get it.

    Mark D. Rumps

    Lafayette

    • I don’t think drug use is covered under the law. I say bust him.

    Mark Acles

    Lafayette

    • Well, they wanted to protect "religious freedom" with this law, didn’t they? Since when should the government determine what qualifies as a religion? This is what happens when we try to mix church and state.

    Noemi Ybarra

    Lafayette

    • Abe Lincoln asked, "If you call a dog’s tail a leg, how many legs would it have?" His answer: "Four. Calling the tail a leg doesn’t make it a leg." Calling a criminal enterprise a church does not make it a church and should be punished as a crime.

    Tom Haynie

    Buffalo

    • If you think this case is a problem, be glad they amended this monstrosity, or Indiana would be headed toward daily media humiliation. This case is directly similar to the one that started the federal RFRA.

    Randy Studt

    Lafayette

    • I thought the new law was to protect the religious rights of all people? How about the Flat Earth Society? I have it from good authority that in the Star Trek Universe, there is a Flat Universe Society.

    Furman A. Powell

    Lafayette

    • The media created the controversy by exaggerating RFRA to make Gov. Mike Pence look bad. They got their wish. Liberals tend to be the master of unintended consequences, so most rational Indiana residents already expected this type of action. Expect more legislation, more unintended consequences, more wasted tax dollars.

    Dan Sommers

    West Lafayette

    • Join them. Sarcastically, it’s pretty much like I said when you asked a very similar question last December before the state legislature convened: "You’ll see recreation marijuana legalized long before selling ‘to go’ alcohol on a Sunday."

    John Kuntz

    Fowler

    • Any law enforcement or state officials that show up should "take communion" just like everyone else attending the service.

    Bryce Culverhouse

    Lafayette

    • Close the church down, it is illegal in the state of Indiana.

    Carolyn Foust

    Lafayette

    • Shut him down and treat him to a period of time in jail. He is trying an illegal scam, and it will not work.

    Harold Williams

    Shadeland

    • The exact opposite of how they probably will handle it. Honest to goodness.

    Mike Dudgeon

    Lafayette

    • I think it is obvious — if it fits the law, then leave them alone.

    Pat Rund

    Romney

    • This is what no one needs. This is Indiana, for goodness sake. Obviously, one of the more conservative states and this sort of weirdness only makes the underlying message more difficult to get out and for the public and for businesses to take seriously.

    Bill Cochran

    Lafayette

    • If he is following the RFRA, and if the act is to allow religious freedom, what can they do? There is nothing in the law to prevent this church from practicing the rites of its religion.

    Mary Finnegan

    Lafayette

    • Let Bill worship his idol, pot. But, should Bill or any of his followers hurt someone when "all hopped up on dope," the penalty is clear. Bill claims no faith in religion; me, either. My faith is in Jesus, who said, "No one comes to the father but through me."

    Jon Held

    Lafayette

    • Lock them up and throw away the key.

    Jack Lahrman

    Sheffield Township

    • The police and the state should attend the church of their choice.

    David B. Dobbin

    West Lafayette

    • Why should the police or the state get involved unless their newfound religion is infringing on someone’s rights? The less we have Big Brother controlling our thoughts and actions, the more liberty and freedom citizens can preserve.

    Edward Priest

    Battle Ground

    • Under the law for Indiana and marijuana, this would be a criminal act. Indiana police and the state should treat this fairly, as any one who breaks the law. I would hope the dealer’s arrested and faces Indiana courts, as anyone who commits a criminal act.

    Shelby Branstetter

    Lafayette

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 8:40 pm on May 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, drug trafficking, drug trafficking threats, Federal Assistance, , Sen. Mitch McConnell   

    Correspondence from Sen. Mitch McConnell–RE: Marijuana in Kentucky 


    mcconnell_header650

     

    Dear Mrs. Krider:

    Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana.  Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate. 

    In your correspondence, you expressed your thoughts on rescheduling marijuana from its current status as a Schedule I controlled substance.  Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state.  According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, in 2013, approximately 440,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 85 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations.  Kentucky carries the dubious distinction of ranking as one of the top marijuana producing states in the nation.  Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats.

    That is why I recently invited Michael Botticelli, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, also known as the "Drug Czar," to attend a forum in Northern Kentucky to hear firsthand accounts of the devastating impact of prescription drug and heroin abuse in the Commonwealth.  Along with bringing him to the Commonwealth, I continue working to provide law enforcement with the tools and resources they need to combat drug abuse; this effort has included advocating on behalf of several Kentucky counties to ensure their successful inclusion into the Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, which qualifies them for additional federal assistance to combat drug trafficking threats.

    There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities.  Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization.  That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 114th Congress progresses.

    Again, thank you for contacting me about this important matter.  If you would like to receive periodic updates from my office, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://www.mcconnell.senate.gov, become a fan of my page on Facebook by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.  In the meantime, I hope you will continue to keep me informed of issues important to you.

    Sincerely,

    MITCH McCONNELL
    UNITED STATES SENATOR

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:35 pm on April 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , drug laws, , , Michele Leonhart,   

    Marijuana Reform Activists Push for Change with DEA Head 


     

     

    DEA administrator Michele Leonhart testifies before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in a hearing on sexual harassment and misconduct allegations at the DEA and FBI in Washington on April 14, 2015.

     

    And the resignation of Chief of Administration Michele Leonhart offers the chance for change

    Marijuana legalization advocates are excited about the departure of Michele Leonhart, the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration, whom they long considered an obstruction in their goal of reforming the nation’s drug laws.

    “We are happy to see her go,” says Dan Riffle, the director of federal policies at the Marijuana Policy Project. “She’s a career drug warrior at a time when we’ve decided the ‘War on Drugs’ is an abject failure.”

    Leonhart has been at the DEA for 35 years and served as the top dog since 2007. Though the recent scandal involving agents soliciting sex from prostitutes is what will likely most clearly tarnish her reputation, her position on drug policy has led marijuana reform activists to call for her resignation, says says Neill Franklin of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. Franklin, a veteran of the Maryland state police, calls her position on marijuana reform “archaic.”

    Leonhart has been a major hurdle in the effort to reconsider marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance, which could pave the way for more research into the health benefits of the drug. In 2011, the agency again rejected a petition to reschedule marijuana. According to the Drug Policy Alliance, the agency spent about $100 million in 2012 alone on enforcement regarding medical marijuana laws.

    More

    Vancouver’s 4/20 Marijuana Smoke Fest Sees 64 Taken to HospitalWillie Nelson to Launch His Own Brand of MarijuanaJurors Shown Video of Tsarnaev Flipping Off Camera NBC NewsReagan Shooter Hinckley Has Girlfriend, Brother Says NBC NewsElian Gonzalez Sparked a Cuba-U.S Firestorm 15 Years Ago NBC News

    “Leonhart opposed medical marijuana, she opposed sentencing reform, she opposed pretty much everything that Obama was doing and for that matter everything Congress was doing,” says Bill Piper, the director of National Affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance.

    The Drug Policy Alliance is one of several drug and marijuana policy organizations that have previously called for Leonhart’s removal. Following a speech in which Leonhart was critical of Obama’s assertion that smoking marijuana was no more harmful that drinking alcohol, the Marijuana Policy Project and over 47,000 citizens called for her to resign. A Drug Policy Alliance petition called for her removal following revelations that the DEA had been tracking citizens’ phone calls for decades. Organizations including Students for Sensible Drug Policy and the National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws have also called for her resignation.

    Though who will be filling in for Leonhart isn’t yet clear, activists say her replacement should be more supportive of ongoing reform initiatives, including reducing mass incarceration and taking the health impact of drugs into consideration when formulating policy. What’s more, Piper says, her removal could lead the Obama administration to reschedule marijuana before the President leaves office.

    “This offers a good opportunity for marijuana reform to move forward quicker than it has been moving,” Piper says.

    More than that, though, it could signal and even steeper change to policy regarding the enforcement of drug laws. As more states consider legalizing marijuana in some form—23 states have legalized medical use and four have given the green light to toking up recreationally. Six additional states could consider legalization during the 2016 election. As the nation’s stance on that shifts, so too should its approach to drug enforcement, advocates say.

    “Within the next 10 years, I see massive drug policy reform and therefore really an end to the DEA,” Franklin says. The new leader, he says, should approach the role as if he or she is “dismantling a decommissioned battleship and selling the pieces for scrap metal.”

    “For most part, the DEA exists because they’re enforcing prohibition,” he adds. “I believe we’re moving away from prohibition and more toward health.”

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:59 pm on April 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Compassionate and Sensible Access Act, , , Sacramento   

    California: “COMPASSIONATE AND SENSIBLE ACCESS ACT” 


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    CALIFORNIA PATIENTS FILE THE “COMPASSIONATE AND SENSIBLE ACCESS ACT”AS A STATEWIDE CONSTITUTIONAL INITIATIVE

    Sacramento, California

    Washington State and Colorado have failed to provide protection for people who use cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    Corporate greed has brought new players into the legalization movement. These people seek to corner the marijuana distribution market by eliminating competition and access to increase their profit.

    These people seek to continue the high profits of Prohibition by the continued criminalization and attacks against people who choose to use cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    This initiative will protect patients and their doctors. Members and leaders of The California Cannabis Coalition, Yuba County ASA, Orange County Norml, Crusaders for Patient’s Rights along with several statewide activists are sponsoring.

    TEXT

    INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT TO BE SUBMITTED DIRECTLY TO THE VOTERS

    Title: The Compassionate and Sensible Access Act

    Findings and Declarations

    The People of the State of California, through the passage of the Compassionate Use Act, recognize that cannabis in all forms, including but not limited to its flowers, leaves, and derivatives and concentrates thereof, is an alternative medicinal treatment.

    Since the passage of the Compassionate Use Act, more and more evidence supports the People’s conclusion that cannabis is a valuable medicinal herb.

    Despite this evidence and the People’s desire to make access to cannabis safe and affordable to anyone it may help, many local jurisdictions have sought to pass regulations and restrictions effectively denying such safe and affordable access.

    Therefore, We the People propose this Compassionate and Sensible Access Act be added to the Constitution of the State of California:

    Cannabis is a legitimate, alternative medicinal treatment. Therefore:

    (1) No state or local agency or body shall adopt a law that burdens in any way the ability of doctors to recommend cannabis for medicinal and/or therapeutic purposes, unless said law applies such burden equally to the recommendation of other herbal or therapeutic treatments.

    (2) No state or local agency or body shall pass any law which impedes a patient’s ability to obtain or cultivate cannabis in any manner that is consistent with the other flora cultivation and business in said jurisdiction.

    (3) No state or local agency or body shall enact any legislation that impedes a patient’s ability to obtain, transport or cultivate cannabis, so long as the method of obtaining, cultivating or transporting cannabis is consistent with the business practices and/or cultivation practices of other flora in said jurisdiction.

    (4) No state or local agency or body shall adopt laws that create non-competitive marketplaces for medical cannabis and its derivatives.

    Definitions

    For the purposes of this act, cannabis is defined as (a) a genus of flowering plants that includes three different species, Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica and Cannabis ruderalis, (b) any member of such genus, and (c) any part or any derivative of such plant or plants.

    This section shall be interpreted liberally to effect the purposes set forth herein.

    http://www.californiacannabiscoalition.org

     
  • ShereeKrider 8:06 pm on April 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: doctors, , , , , mandates, , , ,   

    Make the FDA Advisory, Not Mandatory 


    You should control what medicines you use, not the FDA. The FDA should make advisory recommendations only. It should NOT have the power to mandate which drugs you can buy, and which you cannot.

    • If pharmaceutical companies value the FDA seal of approval, then they can pay the FDA to evaluate their drugs.
    • If consumers value FDA approval, then they can decide to only buy FDA approved drugs.

    If the FDA’s seal of approval is really so valuable, then it does NOT need to be mandatory. No coercion is necessary. Instead, the FDA should be able to sell its services through voluntary means, just like Underwriter’s Laboratory does.

    Consumers and doctors should be free to consult available science, and make their own decisions about which treatments to try.

    All human beings are unique. Treatments that might be dangerous for one person, could be the only possible solution for another. There is zero chance that one-size-fits-all dictates can possibly account for the vastness of human variability. Patients and doctors must have the flexibility to deal with individual human uniqueness.

    The FDA should serve, not rule.

    Talking Points:

    There are thousands of reasons why the FDA should lose its power to coerce you and your loved ones. Some of these reasons will be listed below, so that you can use them when writing to Congress, or when asking your friends to contact Congress on this issue . . .

    The FDA gives consumers a false sense of security. Americans assume that the FDA is actually protecting them, but it is not. For instance . . .

    The Union of Concerned Scientists surveyed 6,000 FDA scientists in 2006, and 1,000 of them responded with the following disturbing admissions:

    • 17% admitted that they had been "asked explicitly by FDA decision makers to provide incomplete, inaccurate, or misleading information to the public, regulated industry, media, or elected/senior government officials."
    • Less than half agreed that the FDA "routinely provides complete and accurate information to the public."
    • 47% admitted to being aware of instances "where commercial interests have inappropriately induced or attempted to induce the reversal, withdrawal, or modification of FDA determinations of actions."

    The FDA is constantly attempting to expand its powers. The people in that agency are relentlessly pushing into areas that are NOT part of their mandate — even where there is NO problem that needs to be fixed.

    For Example: The FDA has made repeated attempts to regulate vitamins and supplements, even though there is no evidence that these things present any danger. Quite the contrary — vitamins and supplements are a powerful example of how health outcomes can be improved, without FDA involvement. The website of the Life Extension Foundation is full of scientific citations to demonstrate this. For instance . . .

    A review of 2009 information for "adverse events" reported to the national control center’s data system shows that, NO major adverse events or deaths were reported for . . .

    • Botanical supplements like St. John’s wort, ginseng, and Echinacea
    • Hormone supplements like DHEA, melatonin, and pregnenolone
    • Phytoestrogen supplements
    • The joint- and cartilage-support supplements glucosamine and chondroitin
    • Vitamins A and E, and only one adverse event each was reported for vitamin B6 and C

    In total, 41 major adverse events were reported for the entire spectrum of supplements including botanicals, amino acids, and vitamins, and only one was a death.

    In contrast, more than 7,000 major adverse events were reported for pharmaceutical drugs, including a total of 496 deaths. And based on previous studies, we know the overall death rate for physician prescribed drugs to be far higher.

    The Downsize DC position is pro-choice. The FDA should serve, not rule.

    Use the form at right to send your elected representatives a letter about this issue. It’s easy!

    • Your position will be counted by each Congressional office,
    • Will educate the Congressional staffer who reads it,
    • May be passed up the chain of command,
    • May receive a reply (many DC Downsizers get them). If you receive such a letter, please share it with us at Comments@DownsizeDC.org.

     

    Send a letter to Congress

    We provide the first few words of the letter so that Congressional offices will see the most important point

    right at the start, and so that no one can hijack our system for another purpose.

    Here’s the part we provide . . .

    Make the FDA advisory, not mandatory.

    LINK

    CONTINUE READING….

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:17 pm on April 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: health, , surgeon general, Vivek Murthy, Whitehouse, whitehouse.gov   

    Surgeon General Vivek Murthy answering questions from public on twitter today …. 


     

    Please be advised, I received the following email from Vivek Murthy – the new surgeon general, and he is taking public questions online through his twitter account today only!  Below is the link to the twitter account and also a copy of the letter I received.

     

    @Surgeon_General.

     

    The White House, Washington

     

    Hi, everyone —

    I’m the Surgeon General of the United States — which means it’s my job to keep America healthy by providing you with the best scientific information available about your health.

    Yesterday, I had the opportunity to meet with President Obama, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and health care professionals to discuss climate change. We talked about the impact of climate change on public health and the importance of prevention.

    Clearly, we all have a stake in our national and global health. Every single one of us stands to benefit from a public health system that is focused on wellness and prevention — not one that simply focuses on treating sickness and disease.

    So as part of National Public Health Week, I’m taking your questions. If you’re on Twitter, and you’ve got a question about the impact of climate change on health — or any other public health topic — shoot it my way using the hashtag #AskTheSurgeonGeneral.

    I’ll be answering your questions via video throughout the afternoon tomorrow from my Twitter account, @Surgeon_General.

    Every one of us wants to do what we can to protect the health of our families, including the health of our grandchildren and future generations. That starts with being informed about how we can keep ourselves, and one another, healthy — particularly in the face of a changing climate.

    I’m looking forward to hearing what you have to say.

    Stay healthy, America.

    VM

    U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy
    @Surgeon_General

    Visit WhiteHouse.gov

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:01 pm on March 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Darrell Hayden, , , Loretto Kentucky, , President Obama   

    One person from Kentucky on President Obama’s Pardon list… 


    Image result for no jail for pot

     
  • ShereeKrider 1:34 pm on March 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , David Zuckerman, , nullification, S.95, Vermont   

    Vermont Bill would Legalize Marijuana, Effectively Nullify Federal Prohibition 


    A bill introduced in Vermont would authorize marijuana to be taxed and regulated similar to alcohol, legalizing the plant, and effectively nullifying the federal prohibition on the same.

    Senate Bill 95 (S.95) was introduced on Feb. 18 by State Sen. David Zuckerman (D-Chittenden). If this bill is successful, Vermont would become the first state to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes through the legislature rather than the popular vote.

    SB95 would allow “a person who is 21 years of age or older to possess limited amounts of marijuana for personal use, while retaining civil and criminal penalties for possession above the limits and for unauthorized dispensing or sale of marijuana” and would create “civil penalties for a person who is under 21 years of age who possesses marijuana or attempts to procure marijuana from a registered marijuana establishment.”

    Under the bill, Vermont residents would be authorized to possess “two mature marijuana plants; seven immature marijuana plants; one ounce of marijuana; and any additional marijuana produced by the person’s marijuana plants, provided that any amount of marijuana in excess of one ounce of marijuana must be possessed in the same secure indoor facility where the plants were cultivated.” Nonresidents would be allowed to possess a quarter ounce of marijuana.

    Dispensaries and retail marijuana shops would be allowed under SB95 if they pay the necessary fees and follow appropriate licensing procedures outlined in the bill. Marijuana distribution centers must be 1000 feet from schools and child-care facilities. Marijuana possession and distribution conducted in ways not authorized by SB95 would be punishable by a civil infraction, and then possibly jail time.

    Bills like SB95 are sweeping the nation, and for good reason. Reforms like these can affect federal policy while circumventing the Washington D.C. power structure completely. The best thing about measures such as SB95 is that they are completely lawful and Constitutional, and there is little if anything the feds can do to stop them!

    CONSTITUTIONALITY

    Congress and the president claim the constitutional authority to ban marijuana. The Supreme Court concurs. However, nearly two-dozen states have taken steps to put the well-being of their citizens above the so-called federal supremacy by legalizing marijuana to varying degrees anyway.

    “The rapidly growing and wildly successful state-level movement to legalize marijuana, either completely, or for medical use, proves that states can successfully effectively reject unconstitutional federal acts. The feds can claim the authority to prohibit pot all they want, but it clearly has done nothing to deter states from moving forward with plans to allow it, pushed by the will of the people,” Tenth Amendment Center executive director Michael Boldin said.

    The momentum is on our side, but Vermont cannot legalize it without your help. This effort needs your support to achieve victory. SB95 is currently in Senate Committee on Judiciary where it will need to successfully pass through before it can receive a full vote in the state senate.

    ACTION ITEMS

    If you live in Vermont, support this bill by following all the action steps at THIS LINK.

    All Other States, take action to push back against the federal drug war at this link.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:35 pm on February 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , drug possession, , Jimmy Carter, penalties   

    Penalties against possession of a drug should not be more damaging to an individual than the use of the drug itself 


     

    Tom Johnson      ‎U.S. Marijuana Party of Pennsylvania

     Lancaster, PA ·

    Penalties against possession of a drug should not be more damaging to an individual than the use of the drug itself; and where they are, they should be changed. Nowhere is this more clear than in the laws against possession of marijuana in private for personal use. We can, and should, continue to discourage the use of marijuana, but this can be done without defining the smoker as a criminal. States which have already removed criminal penalties for marijuana use, like Oregon and California, have not noted any significant increase in marijuana smoking. The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse concluded five years ago that marijuana use should be decriminalized, and I believe it is time to implement those basic recommendations. ~ President Jimmy Carter Aug 2, 1977

    http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu

    The American Presidency Project contains the most comprehensive collection of resources pertaining to the study of the President of the United States. Compiled by John Woolley and Gerhard Peters

     
  • ShereeKrider 1:50 am on February 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSA, , , , , , , Repeal Prohibition,   

    Prohibition Repeal Is A Good Model For Marijuana Legalization 


    9:51 AM 12/05/2014

    Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market at the California Heritage Market in Los Angeles, California July 11, 2014.  REUTERS/David McNew

    Today is the 81st anniversary of the repeal of federal alcohol prohibition.

    The 21st Amendment ended the failed experiment of Prohibition and delegated the issue of alcohol legalization and regulation solely to the states.

    The 21st Amendment was neither “for” nor “against” alcohol. It was simply an acknowledgment that federal prohibition was an obvious failure and a nod towards state’s and individual rights. No state was required to legalize alcohol. It was their choice.

    The repeal of prohibition has been a tremendous success. This country has the best regulated beverage alcohol industry in the world while still being the world’s most dynamic. Just ask any beer drinker!

    Fast forward to the present. Republicans made huge gains in last month’s elections, decisively winning control of the Senate, increasing their dominance in the House to a level not seen since the 40’s, controlling 33 governorships and more state legislators than any time since the 1920s. They now have the opportunity to cement and expand these gains and to create a permanent majority.

    How? By leading the charge to end the federal prohibition of marijuana. You don’t have to be “pro-cannabis” to be against prohibition.

    Like it or not, illicit marijuana is available in every corner of this country. Any teenager can get it with little effort. Most say it’s far easier to get than beer.

    Criminal gangs across the country rake in tens of billions of dollars each year selling marijuana. Milton Friedman once said, “See, if you look at the drug war from a purely economic point of view, the role of the government is to protect the drug cartel. That’s literally true.”

    In 2012, 750,000 people were arrested for mere possession. That’s about one arrest every 48 seconds! And a disproportionate number of the people arrested on marijuana-related charges are minorities.

    The federal prohibition of marijuana has been as profound a failure as the attempted federal prohibition against alcohol. The solution is the same. Let the states decide and regulate as they see fit.

    Here in Colorado, the legalization of marijuana has been a resounding success. Teen use is down. Auto fatalities are at near historic lows. Crime is down across the board. Tax revenue is flowing in.

    If Republicans want to expand their base, they need to show they truly believe in a liberty-based agenda. Reach out to groups that historically have not been favorable to the Republican brand and prove through action that they have much more in common than they might think. Individual freedom is a winning message for people of all colors and all walks of life.

    Republicans in Congress should pass legislation within their first 60 days in office repealing federal prohibition and placing the issue with the individual states and their citizens.

    A statement such as, “I’m personally against it but believe in the wisdom of the people” can be a get-out-of-jail-free card for all who fear being branded pro-marijuana. The issue isn’t for or against marijuana but rather whether a legal, state regulated market is preferable to a prohibition market. Alcohol or marijuana, the answer to this is clear.

    The alternative is Republicans turning off another generation of voters who think of them as the party that speaks of individual freedom but whose actions suggest they want to control other people’s lives. These folks have seen the failure of big government and most big institutions. Their loyalty can be obtained, but the party has to walk the walk.

    Think I exaggerate? Here in Colorado, the Republican challenger for governor was ahead by 10 points in a September poll. Then, showing the Republican skill for snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, he stated he would like to recriminalize marijuana. His lead evaporated almost overnight.

    He lost by 58,000 votes and singlehandedly damaged the Republican brand for a generation of young Colorado voters. There are over 10,000 people directly employed in this Colorado industry and hundreds of thousands of consumers. That’s a lot of voters to antagonize; many of them motivated single issue folks.

    What if the GOP could create a new supporter every 48 seconds rather than trying to throw them in jail?

    Freedom and liberty win. Prohibition and attempting to control people’s lives loses. Republicans, if you believe what you say, end the federal prohibition on marijuana. A permanent majority awaits. It is yours for the taking.

    John Conlin is a self-employed management consultant providing services to beer, wine, and spirits distributors across the country. He is also in the process of starting a marijuana-infused edibles company.

     

    CONTINUE READING…

     

    Tags: John Conlin, Marijuana, Prohibition

     
  • ShereeKrider 8:40 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: crimes, decriminalization bill, , , , punishments   

    Decoding the Kentucky Marijuana Bills 


     

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    The following is a synopsis of the proposed Bills currently in House and what they mean to us.

     

    HB 305/CI (BR 395) – B. Yonts

    AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.
    Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to pre-payable violations and set fines.

    Feb 5-introduced in House

    Legislature Home Page | Record Front Page

    Thru the DIRECT LINK above can be found the newest version of the Kentucky “decrim” bill.

     

    The highlights for the cannabis users are below:

     

    (1) A person is guilty of possession of marijuana when he or she knowingly and unlawfully possesses marijuana.
    (2) Any person who violates this section shall be fined one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense

     

    (1) “Drug paraphernalia” means all equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter. It includes but is not limited to:

     

    (a) Kits used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, or harvesting of any species of plant which is a controlled substance or from which a controlled substance can be derived;

     

    (e) Scales and balances used, intended for use, or designed for use in weighing or measuring controlled substances;

     

    (g) Separation gins and sifters used, intended for use, or designed for use in removing twigs and seeds from, or in otherwise cleaning or refining marijuana;
    (h) Blenders, bowls, containers, spoons, and mixing devices used, intended for use, or designed for use in compounding controlled substances;
    (i) Capsules, balloons, envelopes, and other containers used, intended for use, or designed for use in packaging small quantities of controlled substances;

     

    (l) Objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish, or hashish oil into the human body, such as: metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes with or without screens, permanent screens, hashish heads, or punctured metal bowls; water pipes; carburetion tubes and devices; smoking and carburetion masks; roach clips which mean objects used to hold burning material, such as marijuana cigarettes, that have become too small or too short to be held in the hand; miniature cocaine spoons, and cocaine vials; chamber pipes; carburetor pipes; electric pipes; air-driven pipes; chillums; bongs; ice pipes or chillers.

     

    My opinion on this bill is that it is a “ lesser of the evils” for us and that is IT. Period.

    In fact I am not sure how much of a lesser evil it really is when you consider that this is not any form of legalization at all.  It is just a reduction in the punishment for an illegal activity.

     

    SB 79/CI (BR 805) – P. Clark

     

         AN ACT relating to marijuana.
         Amend KRS 218A.1422 to make the possession of two ounces of marijuana or less a violation punishable by a maximum fine of $75; amend KRS 218A.1423 to make cultivation of five marijuana plants or less a Class B misdemeanor; name the Act the Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act.

         Jan 9-introduced in Senate
         Feb 3-to Judiciary (S)

    Thru the DIRECT LINK above can be found the first version of the Kentucky “decrim” bill as shown below.

     

    (1) A person is guilty of possession of marijuana when he or she knowingly and unlawfully possesses marijuana.

    (2) Possession of two (2) ounces of marijuana or less shall be a violation that is punishable by a maximum fine of seventy-five dollars ($75).

    (3) Possession of more than two (2) ounces of marijuana is a Class B misdemeanor, except that, KRS Chapter 532 to the contrary notwithstanding, the maximum term of incarceration shall be no greater than forty-five (45) days.

    âSection 2. KRS 218A.1423 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of marijuana cultivation when he knowingly and unlawfully plants, cultivates, or harvests marijuana with the intent to sell or transfer it.

    (2) Marijuana cultivation of six (6)[five (5)] or more plants of marijuana is:

    (a) For a first offense a Class D felony.
    (b) For a second or subsequent offense a Class C felony.

    (3) Marijuana cultivation of fewer than six (6)[five (5)] plants is[:

    ] a Class B misdemeanor

    [(a) For a first offense a Class A misdemeanor.
    (b) For a second or subsequent offense a Class D felony].

    (4) The planting, cultivating, or harvesting of six (6)[five (5)] or more marijuana plants shall be prima facie evidence that the marijuana plants were planted, cultivated, or harvested for the purpose of sale or transfer.

    âSection 3. This Act shall be known and may be cited as the Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act.

     

    My opinion on this Bill is that it would be the better of the two “decrim” Bills submitted because at least there is a “grow” clause in it as long as you are not “trafficking”.  However, Marijuana still remains illegal and prohibited by law under this Statute as well.  The laws are all about the “control” issue.  Either way they continue to make money at our expense for growing and using a “plant”.  As well as the fact that we remain criminals.

     

    Last but not least is the :

    Medical Marijuana Bill Kentucky 2015 , SB 43/LM/CI (BR 287)

     

    AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.
         Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to establish a comprehensive system for medical cannabis in Kentucky, including provisions for medical verification of need, persons allowed to cultivate, use, and possess the drug, organizations allowed to assist in providing the drug, regulation by the state Department for Public Health, interaction with state and local governments, including law enforcement, with persons and entities coming within the purview of the Act, and the establishment of required reporting and review procedures; amend KRS 218A.040 to conform; name the Act the Cannabis Compassion Act.

         Jan 7-introduced in Senate
         Jan 13-to Licensing, Occupations, & Administrative Regulations (S)

    READ AS FOLLOWS:  Direct Link to Bill

    For the purposes of Sections 1 to 25 of this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:

    (1) "Bona fide practitioner-patient relationship" means that:

    (a) A practitioner and patient have a treatment or consulting relationship, during the course of which the physician has completed an assessment of the patient’s medical history and current medical condition, including an appropriate personal physical examination;

     

    (b) The practitioner has consulted with the patient with respect to the patient’s debilitating medical condition; and
    (c) The physician is available to or offers to provide follow-up care and treatment to the patient, including but not limited to patient examinations;

    (2) "Cannabis" means all parts of the plant Cannabis sp., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant, its seeds or resin or any compound, mixture, or preparation which contains any quantity of these substances. The term "cannabis" does not include industrial hemp as defined in KRS 260.850;

    (3) "Cardholder" means a qualifying patient, visiting qualifying patient, or a designated caregiver who has been issued and possesses a valid registry identification card;

     

    In my opinion this is an all out medical marijuana bill with all the regulations, Doctors, Pharmaceutical entities as well as Dispensaries lined up in a row.  Once again, Freedom is not involved here.  It is regulation at its finest through all aspects of the Government.   If it is regulated medical marijuana that a patient is looking for then this would be the Bill for them.  For many people it may be a good thing.  However, it still does not free the Cannabis plant to the general public and the Statutes of controlled substances will still be alive and well with this Bill.

     

    This is three options that we have in Kentucky that may or most probably won’t pass this year anyway.  But not one of these options repeals prohibition even on a State level and will still open up persecution of those choosing to use Cannabis which fall short of the guidelines set by the State Government even if one or more of them are passed.

     

    I still believe the only way to get society at large out of the mouth of the prison industrial complex for using Cannabis in any form is REPEAL of all laws pertaining to the Cannabis plant!

    Prohibition did not work – Neither will Legalization – It is time to REPEAL and nullify unconstitutional Statutes regarding the cultivation and use of Marijuana on a Human level!

     
  • ShereeKrider 6:38 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , General Assembly, , , , , , misdeameanor, violations   

    Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to pre-payable violations and set fines. 


     

     

    HB 305/CI (BR 395) – B. Yonts

         AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.
         Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to prepayable violations and set fines.

         Feb 5-introduced in House

    Legislature Home Page | Record Front Page

     

    Thru the DIRECT LINK above can be found the newest version of the Kentucky “decrim” bill.

    The following text has been copied from that record:

     

    AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.

    Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky:

    âSection 1. KRS 218A.1422 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of possession of marijuana when he or she knowingly and unlawfully possesses marijuana.

    (2) Any person who violates this section shall be fined one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[Possession of marijuana is a Class B misdemeanor, except that, KRS Chapter 532 to the contrary notwithstanding, the maximum term of incarceration shall be no greater than forty-five (45) days].

    âSection 2. KRS 218A.210 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person to whom or for whose use any controlled substance has been prescribed, sold, or dispensed, by a practitioner or other person authorized under this chapter, may lawfully possess it only in the container in which it was delivered to him by the person selling or dispensing the same.

    (2) Any person who violates this section shall be fined two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[Violation of subsection (1) of this section is a Class B misdemeanor for the first offense and a Class A misdemeanor for subsequent offenses].

    âSection 3. KRS 218A.500 is amended to read as follows:

    As used in this section and KRS 218A.510:

    (1) "Drug paraphernalia" means all equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter. It includes but is not limited to:

    (a) Kits used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, or harvesting of any species of plant which is a controlled substance or from which a controlled substance can be derived;
    (b) Kits used, intended for use, or designed for use in manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, or preparing controlled substances;
    (c) Isomerization devices used, intended for use, or designed for use in increasing the potency of any species of plant which is a controlled substance;
    (d) Testing equipment used, intended for use, or designed for use in identifying, or in analyzing the strength, effectiveness or purity of controlled substances;
    (e) Scales and balances used, intended for use, or designed for use in weighing or measuring controlled substances;
    (f) Diluents and adulterants, such as quinine hydrochloride, mannitol, mannite, dextrose and lactose, used, intended for use, or designed for use in cutting controlled substances;
    (g) Separation gins and sifters used, intended for use, or designed for use in removing twigs and seeds from, or in otherwise cleaning or refining marijuana;
    (h) Blenders, bowls, containers, spoons, and mixing devices used, intended for use, or designed for use in compounding controlled substances;
    (i) Capsules, balloons, envelopes, and other containers used, intended for use, or designed for use in packaging small quantities of controlled substances;
    (j) Containers and other objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in storing or concealing controlled substances;
    (k) Hypodermic syringes, needles, and other objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in parenterally injecting controlled substances into the human body; and
    (l) Objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish, or hashish oil into the human body, such as: metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes with or without screens, permanent screens, hashish heads, or punctured metal bowls; water pipes; carburetion tubes and devices; smoking and carburetion masks; roach clips which mean objects used to hold burning material, such as marijuana cigarettes, that have become too small or too short to be held in the hand; miniature cocaine spoons, and cocaine vials; chamber pipes; carburetor pipes; electric pipes; air-driven pipes; chillums; bongs; ice pipes or chillers.

    (2) It is unlawful for any person to use, or to possess with intent to use, drug paraphernalia for the purpose of planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packing, repacking, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter.

    (3) It is unlawful for any person to deliver, possess with intent to deliver, or manufacture with intent to deliver, drug paraphernalia, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that it will be used to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, inject, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter.

    (4) It is unlawful for any person to place in any newspaper, magazine, handbill, or other publication any advertisement, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that the purpose of the advertisement, in whole or in part, is to promote the sale of objects designed or intended for use as drug paraphernalia.

    (5) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[guilty of a Class A misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 4. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 218A IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 5. KRS 434.851 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful access in the third degree when he or she, without the effective consent of the owner, knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly accesses, causes to be accessed, or attempts to access any computer software, computer program, data, computer, computer system, computer network, or any part thereof, which results in the loss or damage of less than three hundred dollars ($300).

    (2) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for each offense[Unlawful access to a computer in the third degree is a Class A misdemeanor].

    âSection 6. KRS 434.853 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful access in the fourth degree when he or she, without the effective consent of the owner, knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly accesses, causes to be accessed, or attempts to access any computer software, computer program, data, computer, computer system, computer network, or any part thereof, which does not result in loss or damage.

    (2) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[Unlawful access to a computer in the fourth degree is a Class B misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 7. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 434 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 8. KRS 511.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the second degree when he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in a building or upon premises as to which notice against trespass is given by fencing or other enclosure.

    (2) Criminal trespass in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 9. KRS 511.080 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the third degree when he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in or upon premises.

    (2) Criminal trespass in the third degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of fifty dollars ($50) for each offense.

    âSECTION 10. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 511 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 11. KRS 512.060 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal possession of a noxious substance when he possesses such substance under circumstances evincing an intent unlawfully to use or cause it to be used to inflict injury upon or to cause annoyance to a person, or to damage property of another, or to disturb the public peace.

    (2) Criminal possession of a noxious substance is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 12. KRS 512.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal littering when he:

    (a) Drops or permits to drop on a highway any destructive or injurious material and does not immediately remove it; or
    (b) Knowingly places or throws litter on any public or private property or in any public or private water without permission; or
    (c) Negligently places or throws glass or other dangerous pointed or edged substances on or adjacent to water to which the public has access for swimming or wading or on or within fifty (50) feet of a public highway; or
    (d) Discharges sewage, minerals, oil products, or litter into any public waters or lakes within the state.

    (2) Criminal littering is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    (3) Violators may prepay to the Circuit Court clerk if prepayment is so noted on the citation and if the littering offense is not combined with an offense that is not prepayable.

    (4) Notwithstanding any language or provision of this section or KRS 65.8808(3) to the contrary, the legislative body of a local government may, by ordinance, choose to classify the offenses proscribed in subsection (1) of this section as civil offenses in accordance with KRS 65.8808.

    âSECTION 13. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 512 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 14. KRS 516.130 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawfully using slugs in the second degree when:

    (a) With intent to defraud the owner, licensee or lessee of a coin machine, he inserts, deposits or uses a slug in such machine; or
    (b) He makes, possesses or disposes of a slug with intent to enable a person to insert, deposit or use it in a coin machine.

    (2) Unlawfully using slugs in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    The offense shall be prepayable except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 15. KRS 517.030 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of false advertising when, in connection with the promotion of the sale of or to increase the consumption of property or services, he knowingly makes or causes to be made a false or misleading statement in any advertisement addressed to the public or to a substantial number of persons.

    (2) False advertising is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    âSection 16. KRS 517.040 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of bait advertising when in any manner, including advertising or other means of communication, he offers to the public or a substantial number of persons property or services as part of a scheme or plan with the intent not to sell or provide the advertised property or services:

    (a) At the price at which he offered them; or
    (b) In a quantity sufficient to meet the reasonably expected public demand, unless the quantity is specifically stated in the advertisement; or
    (c) At all.

    (2) Bait advertising is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 17. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 517 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 18. KRS 519.030 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of compounding a crime when:

    (a) He solicits, accepts or agrees to accept any benefit upon an agreement or understanding that he will refrain from initiating a prosecution for a crime; or
    (b) He confers, offers, or agrees to confer any benefit upon another person upon agreement or understanding that such other person will refrain from initiating a prosecution for a crime.

    (2) In any prosecution under this section, it is a defense that the benefit did not exceed an amount which the defendant reasonably believed to be due as restitution or indemnification for harm caused by the offense.

    (3) Compounding a crime is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor]. The offense shall be prepayable except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 19. KRS 525.050 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful assembly when:

    (a) He assembles with five (5) or more persons for the purpose of engaging or preparing to engage with them in a riot; or
    (b) Being present at an assembly which either has or develops such a purpose, he remains there with intent to advance that purpose.

    (2) Unlawful assembly is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 20. KRS 525.080 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of harassing communications when, with intent to intimidate, harass, annoy, or alarm another person, he or she:

    (a) Communicates with a person, anonymously or otherwise, by telephone, telegraph, mail, or any other form of written communication in a manner which causes annoyance or alarm and serves no purpose of legitimate communication;
    (b) Makes a telephone call, whether or not conversation ensues, with no purpose of legitimate communication; or
    (c) Communicates, while enrolled as a student in a local school district, with or about another school student, anonymously or otherwise, by telephone, the Internet, telegraph, mail, or any other form of electronic or written communication in a manner which a reasonable person under the circumstances should know would cause the other student to suffer fear of physical harm, intimidation, humiliation, or embarrassment and which serves no purpose of legitimate communication.

    (2) Harassing communications is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 21. KRS 525.060 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of disorderly conduct in the second degree when in a public place and with intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, or wantonly creating a risk thereof, he:

    (a) Engages in fighting or in violent, tumultuous, or threatening behavior;
    (b) Makes unreasonable noise;
    (c) Refuses to obey an official order to disperse issued to maintain public safety in dangerous proximity to a fire, hazard, or other emergency; or
    (d) Creates a hazardous or physically offensive condition by any act that serves no legitimate purpose.

    (2) Disorderly conduct in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 22. KRS 525.100 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of public intoxication when he appears in a public place manifestly under the influence of a controlled substance, or other intoxicating substance, excluding alcohol (unless the alcohol is present in combination with any of the above), not therapeutically administered, to the degree that he may endanger himself or other persons or property, or unreasonably annoy persons in his vicinity.

    (2) Public intoxication is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 23. KRS 525.150 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of disrupting meetings and processions in the second degree when, with intent to prevent or disrupt a lawful meeting, procession, or gathering, he or she does any act tending to obstruct or interfere with it physically or makes any utterance, gesture, or display designed to outrage the sensibilities of the group.

    (2) Disrupting meetings and processions in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 24. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 525 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 25. KRS 530.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful transaction with a minor in the third degree when:

    (a) Acting other than as a retail licensee, he knowingly sells, gives, purchases or procures any alcoholic or malt beverage in any form to or for a minor. The defendant may prove in exculpation that the sale was induced by the use of false, fraudulent, or altered identification papers or other documents and that the appearance and character of the purchaser were such that his age could not have been ascertained by any other means and that the purchaser’s appearance and character indicated strongly that he was of legal age to purchase alcoholic beverages. This subsection does not apply to a parent or guardian of the minor;
    (b) He knowingly induces, assists, or causes a minor to engage in any other criminal activity;
    (c) He knowingly induces, assists or causes a minor to become a habitual truant; or
    (d) He persistently and knowingly induces, assists or causes a minor to disobey his parent or guardian.

    (2) Unlawful transaction with a minor in the third degree, other than a violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section, is a Class A misdemeanor. A violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense. A violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section shall be prepayable, except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:42 am on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Cannabinoids, corporate medicine, Medcial Marijuana, , , , Schedule II,   

    Surgeon General Says Yes to Science, Admits Weed Has Medical Benefits 


    Vivek Murthy says marijuana is ‘helpful’ for certain medical conditions. Could this be the tide-turner for legalization?

    Surgeon General Vivek Murthy believes in science.

    As he answered questions Wednesday about the measles outbreak that is turning into the year’s first public health emergency, the 37-year-old doctor assured Americans that vaccines are safe and that government policy is informed by sound data and scientific consensus. When CBS This Morning host Gayle King pivoted to ask Murthy for his views on marijuana, the country’s youngest ever surgeon general gave an answer that was at once historic and entirely consistent with his scientific approach.

    “We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms that marijuana can be helpful,” Murthy said. “We have to use that data to drive policy making.”

    While a first for a surgeon general, this was not actually a risky statement. Murthy’s belief is in line with the positions of the American College of Physicians (PDF), the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Public Health Association, the American Nurses Association (PDF), the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (PDF), The California Medical Association (PDF), Dr. Sanjay Gupta, countless less famous but equally sincere physicians, and laws in 23 states and the District of Washington that permit the use of marijuana for medical conditions including multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, epilepsy, and a host of cancer-related symptoms.

    But the statement also seemed to put the nation’s top health official in direct conflict with federal law. To the Department of Justice and its Drug Enforcement Agency, marijuana remains, along with heroin, a Schedule I narcotic, defined as “drugs with no currently accepted medical use.” Cocaine and crystal meth, on the other hand, are listed as Schedule II drugs, with “less abuse potential.”

    This absurd policy has been inexplicable for so long, that the nation’s highest officials have given up trying to defend it.

    “I don’t think it’s more dangerous than alcohol,” President Obama said to The New Yorker’s David Remnick about marijuana last year. Casual as his remark seemed, Obama rocked the drug reform movement. Just weeks after the president said what a sizable majority of Americans already agreed with, a group of 18 representatives from nine states took a stand on the issue and, in a gesture of bi-partisan consent, wrote a letter (PDF) that called on Obama to take executive action.

    “We were encouraged by your recent comments in your interview with David Remnick,” the name-dropping representatives wrote. “Classifying marijuana as Schedule I at the federal level perpetuates an unjust and irrational system. We request that you instruct Attorney General Holder to delist or classify marijuana in a more appropriate was, at the very least eliminating it from Schedule I or II.”

    This absurd policy has been inexplicable for so long, that the nation’s highest officials have given up trying to defend it.

    Nine months later, in his exit interview with Katie Couric, Holder passed the buck right back.

    “At the federal level marijuana is still classified in the same category as heroin,” Couric said. “In your view should that change?”

    “I think that’s certainly a question that we need to ask ourselves,” Holder said, “whether or not marijuana is as serious a drug as is heroin.” Couric nodded and as Holder weighed the pros and cons, she pressed him on decriminalization. That, he said, is “something for Congress to decide.”

    Congressional action might be Holder’s preference, but it is not actually mandated by the law.

    “Eric Holder could initiate that process today if he wanted to,” said Tom Angell, chairman of Marijuana Majority, a decriminalization advocacy group, and pointed out that the 1970 Controlled Substances Act gives the attorney general sweeping power to define and classify the full schedule of illegal drugs. At the same time, Angell said, “Congress could pass a bill to move marijuana from Schedule I to a lesser one, or make it unscheduled, like alcohol or tobacco.”

    But as public opinion on the issue passes the super majority mark, neither branch of government has made a move. “In essence, the Justice Department and Congress are both begging each other to fix federal marijuana laws,” wrote Christopher Ingraham at the Washington Post. An aide to Senator Rand Paul told The Daily Beast that the Kentucky lawmaker is considering a bill this year that would reschedule the drug. “It’s a work in progress,” the aide said, but couldn’t offer any specifics. 

    In his interview with Couric, Holder left open the possibility that his department could one day endorse rescheduling marijuana. Whatever is decided, Holder said the government should let science be the guide. “Use science as the basis for that determination,” he said.

    A Department of Justice spokesman said, “the Department supports research into potential medical uses of marijuana.” Surgeon General Murthy told the Daily Beast that “marijuana policy—and all public health policies—should be driven by science” and that “the Federal Government has and continues to fund research on possible health benefits of marijuana and its components.”

    The problem with this, said Angell, is how difficult it is even for academic institutions to gain government approval for such studies. The American Medical Association (AMA), one of the most conservative organizations on marijuana decriminalization, changed its long-held position on classification in 2009. Marijuana’s ongoing schedule I classification “limits the access to cannabinols for even research,” said Edward L. Langston, MD, an AMA Board of Trustees member. “It is very difficult,” he told American Medical News, to legally research the substance. A report by the AMA Council on Science and Public Health that same year found that, “bureaucratic hurdles apply to cannabis research that do not impede other drug investigations.”

    Evidence for the claim is not hard to find. At the University of Massachusetts, an agricultural professor has been trying for more than 15 years to gain approval to grow cannabis for research. In Kentucky, the DEA finally released a shipment of research-bound hemp seeds last May, but only after the state’s agricultural commissioner sued the agency in federal court.

    The medical community and public opinion has come a long way in the 20 years since Dr. Jocelyn Elders, Surgeon General under President Bill Clinton, took flak for defending decriminalization. But even as a new surgeon general calls for more science, Angell said the research opportunities won’t change until the laws do, and that politicians are lagging behind most Americans on the issue.

    “They don’t realize that a majority of Americans are ready for medical marijuana to be legalized,” he said. “They perceive it as dangerous when it is not.” 

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 5:59 pm on January 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: deschedule, , , nullify,   


    How reclassifying marijuana under federal law benefits New York businesses, patients

    Businesses preparing to invest millions of dollars in New York’s fledgling medical marijuana industry are betting the ever-present risk of federal agents shutting them down disappears in the near future.

    They received help this week when a doctors’ group urged federal lawmakers to reclassify the drug.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics released a report that promoted changing marijuana from a Drug Enforcement Administration schedule I to a schedule II drug.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/blog/health-care/2015/01/how-reclassifying-marijuana-under-federal-law.html

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:26 am on January 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CBD Oil, , , Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana,   

    Jaime Montalvo–Guest Editorial WDRB, Louisville, Ky. 


    Guest POV | Medical Marijuana

    Posted: Jan 28, 2015 9:33 AM CST Updated: Jan 28, 2015 3:55 PM CST

    WDRB Guest Editorial By Jaime Montalvo

     

    I have Multiple Sclerosis. I’ve been fighting this disease for eight years.

    I have muscle spasms, tremor uncontrollably, and I’m scared. Cannabis relieves these symptoms.

    In Kentucky, thousands of Veterans suffer from PTSD and haven’t responded to treatment.

    Sadly, too many choose suicide as a last resort for escaping their demons. I have personal combat veteran friends who testify that smoking Cannabis relieves them within seconds after waking up from horrendous nightmares.

    Kentucky has the highest cancer death rate of all 50 states. You probably know someone who has had cancer. Cancer treatments also bring some of the most debilitating side effects. Twenty thousand Kentuckians a year face this diagnosis. Marijuana has been studied and proven to relieve these effects. The nausea brought about by chemotherapy is relieved within seconds of inhaling Cannabis.

    The Epilepsy Foundation of Kentuckiana reports over 90,000 individuals suffer from epilepsy in our area. Like cancer treatments, medications used to manage seizures have debilitating side effects. Not every patient can tolerate the treatments, and the drugs often stop working. Cannabis oil has been heralded for decreasing certain patients’ seizures from 300 per week to zero or one.

    Cannabis is helping us cope with our symptoms. Please help us by contacting your legislator at 800-372-7181 asking them to support medical marijuana legislation.

    I’m Jaime Montalvo, founder of Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana, and that’s my point of view.

     

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 8:20 pm on January 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dr. John Ip, Erin Grossman Vu, Kentucky healthcare, Lansing Michigan, , St. Jude   

    Kentucky heart patient relocates to Michigan, receives medical marijuana legally and then an experimental pacemaker … it gets worse from there! 


    Kentucky – January 19, 2015

     

    Erin Vu - pacemaker no leads

    Above:  Nanostim™ Leadless Pacemaker

    Ms. Erin Grossman Vu, a legal resident of Kentucky who has been disabled for some years with congenital heart disease, relocated on 10-5-2013 to Michigan where she was living with relatives when she was accepted into a Medical Marijuana Program.

    “I was first diagnosed with Supraventricular tachycardia. My first event happened when I was still working as a nurse. My heart rate popped up to 250’s & sustained. I’ve been shocked by the paddles. Have been seen in every ER in Metro Louisville for the SVT I was having. I had three cardiac ablations done here in Louisville and the fourth was done in Lansing by Dr. Ip.  After the 4th ablation, I began having slow heart rate events where my heart would drop to 32 bpm no warning & have to sit down or will pass out. Blood can clot at 32 bpm.”

    She is one of less than 350 souls in the Nation to have this type of experimental device implanted directly into the heart on 7-10-14. 

    She said that her new heart problem arose before moving and Sick Sinus Syndrome occurred when she was unable to use her CPAP machine during an ice storm and electric was down.

    She was selected to participate in this St. Jude Medical study by the Nation’s leading device implant Cardiologist, Dr. John Ip of Lansing, MI.

    In December she returned to Kentucky and re-established her citizenship here.  She had been referred to a Cardiologist in Lexington Kentucky for follow up care.   However, after the Lexington Cardiologist received her records he refused to treat her and she has yet to be evaluated by him.

    In December she was treated for sustained bradycardia, a slow heart rate, at Louisville’s Norton Surburban Hospital on 12-17-14.

    Pacemakers are supposed to prevent slow heart rates however she still continues to have cardiac events, chest pain, and shortness of air.

    St. Jude Medical and the Lexington Cardiologist (who shall remain unnamed)  have refused to answer why the patient had a slow heart rate with a pacemaker and have refused to give her care at this point.
    St. Jude Medical has refused to investigate as to why a cardiologist would refuse to see a pacemaker patient under their study. The FDA has been contacted about the product manufacturer, St. Jude Medical.

     

    “I’m supposed to be interrogated by February 6th.  I don’t have access to the technology needed to communicate with my device.  St. Jude Medical, the manufacturer set  me up to have care assumed by a very specific cardiologist in Lexington. Only about fifteen people in Kentucky have this device.  I’ve had no resolution, I’ve called all the proper places.”

    “The Lexington Cardiologist won’t see me, period, as patient or study participant.  The Lexington study nurse told me I can’t have two cardiologists. The ONLY reason I’ve been verbally given, doesn’t make sense for a "study", I would have had to cancel a cardiac stress test I had done six days ago. I’ve been in chest pain since 12-17-14 when I had a sustained low heart rate with a pacemaker.”

    At this time it seems that Ms. Grossman Vu is a seriously ill Heart Patient without a Doctor to care for her.  The question remains whether or not this is due to the Medical Marijuana designation she received in Michigan, or the fact that the “leadless pacemaker’s” is in experimental status.  That being said, she was set up with a Lexington Physician who specialized in this according to her Physician in Lansing Michigan.  So what IS THE REAL REASON why she is being rejected by this Cardiologist?

    This issue will be followed up.

    Erin Grossman Vu can be reached at Stjudemedicalpatient@yahoo.com

     

    smk

     
  • ShereeKrider 5:31 pm on January 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CHHI, End Prohibition, , KCHHI, , ,   


    Kentucky Cannabis Hemp Health Initiative 2013-2014-2015

     

     

     

     

    Framework taken from the Jack Herer Initiative aka CCHI1013. An initiative I had the honor of having a personal hand helping to word, redefining the cannabis/marijuana/hemp movement through selective wording. While attempting to protect and free the plant, the farmers, the prisoners, and the people from validating and mandating over regulation and enslavement through the legal lies = legalize = "common words used"  commonly leading us to Corporate G.M.O.’s = {genetic mutated organisms} which "equal genetically modified crops", seed ownership through patent, small farmers being sued or enslaved,… While they continue to build their Military Industrial Complex with our tax dollars, lives…  So it seems only appropriate I use it as a base to follow and put it forth here within the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    THIS IS A DRAFT, PLEASE DO MAKE ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR ANY PROTECTIONS YOU FEEL HAVE BEEN OVER LOOKED AND ARE NEEDED HERE > https://www.facebook.com/notes/kentucky-cannaibis-hemp-health-initiative-2014/kentucky-cannabis-hemp-health-initiative-2014/284385848356111

    AN ACT TO AMEND THE HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY:

    I. Add Section ________ to the Health and Safety Code of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, to amend, nullify, restore through repeal of any and all unconstitutional laws or policies to the contrary, including those on the Federal and U.N. Levels, notwithstanding,:
    1. No person, individual, or corporate entity shall be arrested or prosecuted, be denied any right or privilege, nor be subject to any criminal or civil penalties for the possession, cultivation, transportation, distribution, or consumption of cannabis hemp marijuana, including:
             (a) Cannabis hemp industrial products.
             (b) Cannabis hemp medicinal preparations.
             (c) Cannabis hemp nutritional products.
             (d) Cannabis hemp religious and spiritual products.
             (e) Cannabis hemp recreational and euphoric use and products.
       2. Definition of terms:
             (a) The terms “cannabis hemp” and “cannabis hemp marijuana” mean the natural, non-genetically modified plant hemp, cannabis, marihuana, marijuana, cannabis sativa L, cannabis Americana, cannabis chinensis, cannabis indica, cannabis ruderalis, cannabis sativa, or any variety of cannabis, including any derivative, concentrate, extract, flower, leaf, particle, preparation, resin, root, salt, seed, stalk, stem, or any product thereof.
             (b) The term “cannabis hemp industrial products” means all products made from cannabis hemp that are not designed or intended for human consumption, including, but not limited to: clothing, building materials, paper, fiber, fuel, lubricants, plastics, paint, seed for cultivation, animal feed, veterinary medicine, oil, or any other product that is not designed for internal human consumption; as well as cannabis hemp plants used for crop rotation, erosion control, pest control, weed control, or any other horticultural or environmental purposes, for example, the reversal of the Greenhouse Effect and toxic soil reclamation.
             (c) The term “cannabis hemp medicinal preparations” means all products made from cannabis hemp that are designed, intended, or used for human consumption for the treatment of any human disease or condition, for pain relief, or for any healing purpose, including but not limited to the treatment or relief of: Alzheimer’s and pre-Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, arthritis, asthma, cramps, epilepsy, glaucoma, migraine, multiple sclerosis, nausea, premenstrual syndrome, side effects of cancer chemotherapy, fibromyalgia, sickle cell anemia, spasticity, spinal injury, stress, easement of post-traumatic stress disorder, Tourette syndrome, attention deficit disorder, immunodeficiency, wasting syndrome from AIDS or anorexia; use as an antibiotic, antibacterial, anti-viral, or anti-emetic; as a healing agent, or as an adjunct to any medical or herbal treatment. Mental conditions not limited to bipolar, depression, attention deficit disorder, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, shall be conditions considered for medical use.
             (d) The term “cannabis hemp nutritional products” means cannabis hemp for consumption by humans and animals as food, including but not limited to: seed, seed protein, seed oil, essential fatty acids, seed cake, dietary fiber, or any preparation or extract thereof. Not Taxable
             (e) The term “cannabis hemp euphoric products” means cannabis hemp intended for personal recreational or religious use, other than cannabis hemp industrial products, cannabis hemp medicinal preparations, or cannabis hemp nutritional products.
             (f) The term “personal use” means the internal consumption of cannabis hemp by people 18 years of age or older for any relaxational, meditative, religious, spiritual, recreational, or other purpose other than sale.
             (g) The term “commercial production” means the production of cannabis hemp products for sale or profit under the conditions of these provisions.
            (h) The term "non-genetically modified " is used to define or establish the Prohibition of any and all Unnatural "genetically modified organism (GMO)" is used to refer to any microorganism, plant, or animal in which genetic engineering techniques have been used to introduce, remove, or modify specific parts of its genome of any and all cannabis, cannabis sativa L, marijuana, hemp,…. Examples include plants being modified for pest resistance; lab animals being manipulated to exhibit human diseases, such as sickle cell anemia; and even glowing jellyfish genes inserted in a rabbit for an art piece.
    Ref: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Genetically-modified+organism
    As Apposed To =  To Clarify that there is a Recognized Difference between G.M.O. and Genetically Engineered
           (i) The term "genetic engineering" involves isolating individual DNA fragments, coupling them with other genetic material, and causing the genes to replicate themselves. Introducing this created complex to a host cell causes it to multiply and produce clones that can later be harvested and used for a variety of purposes. Current applications of the technology include medical investigations of gene structure for the control of genetic disease, particularly through antenatal diagnosis. The synthesis of hormones and other proteins (e.g., growth hormone and insulin), which are otherwise obtainable only in their natural state, is also of interest to scientists. Applications for genetic engineering include disease control, hormone and protein synthesis, and animal research.
    Ref: http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Genetically-modified
    3. Industrial cannabis hemp farmers, manufacturers, processors, and distributors shall not be subject to any special zoning requirement, licensing fee, tax that is excessive, discriminatory, double taxation or prohibitive.
       4. Cannabis hemp medicinal preparations are hereby restored to the list of available medicines in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Licensed physicians shall not be penalized for, nor restricted from, prescribing or recommending cannabis hemp for medical purposes to any patient, regardless of age. No tax shall be applied to prescribed cannabis hemp medicinal preparations. Medical research shall be encouraged. No recommending physician shall be subject to any professional licensing review or hearing as a result of recommending or approving medical use of cannabis hemp marijuana. Cannabis hemp nutritious foods are medicine and therefore are subject to current Commonwealth Food & Drug Tax Code Exemptions
    5. Personal use of cannabis hemp euphoric products.
             (a) No permit, license, or tax shall be required for the non-commercial cultivation, transportation, distribution, or consumption of cannabis hemp.
             (b) No unconstitutional Testing for inactive and/or inert residual cannabis metabolites shall not be allowed for employment or insurance, nor be considered in determining employment, other impairment, or intoxication, or qualifications for benefits, programs or education,…  Including Protections of Families, against Unconstitutional Testing for Cannabis residual,… and/or Cannabis Use shall not/can not be used to take Custody of children from their families, parents or legal guardians.
            (c) When a person falls within the conditions of these exceptions, the offense laws do not apply and only the exception laws apply.
    6. Use of cannabis hemp products for religious or spiritual purposes shall be considered an inalienable right; and shall be protected by the full force of the State and Federal Constitutions.
       7. Commerce in cannabis hemp euphoric products shall be limited to adults, 18 years of age and older, and shall be regulated in a manner analogous to the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s tobacco industry model. For the purpose of distinguishing personal from commercial production, 99 flowering female plants and 12 pounds of dried, cured cannabis hemp flowers, bud, not leaf, produced per adult, 18 years of age and older, per year shall be considered as being for personal use.
        8. The manufacture, marketing, distribution, or sales between adults of equipment or accessories designed to assist in the planting, cultivation, harvesting, curing, processing, packaging, storage, analysis, consumption, or transportation of cannabis hemp plants, industrial cannabis hemp products, cannabis hemp medicinal preparations, cannabis hemp nutritional products, cannabis hemp euphoric products, or any cannabis hemp product shall not be prohibited.
        9. No Commonwealth of Kentucky law enforcement personnel or funds shall be used to assist or aid and abet in the enforcement of Federal cannabis hemp marijuana laws involving acts which are hereby declared unconstitutional, therefore no longer illegal, as they are considered repealed and nullified in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
        10. Any person who threatens the enjoyment of these provisions is guilty of a misdemeanor. The maximum penalties and fines of a misdemeanor may be imposed.
    II. Nullify, Repeal, delete, and expunge any and all existing statutory laws that conflict with the provisions of this initiative.
        1. Enactment of this initiative shall include: amnesty, immediate release of custody from prison, jail, parole, and probation, and clearing, expungement, and deletion of all criminal records and/or all social/family service records/cases for all persons currently charged with, or convicted of any non-violent cannabis hemp marijuana offenses included in this initiative which are hereby no longer illegal in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. People who fall within this category that triggered an original sentence are included within this provision.
        2. Within 60 days of the passage of this Act, the Commonwealth Attorney General shall develop and distribute a one-page application, providing for the destruction of all cannabis hemp marijuana criminal records in the Commonwealth of Kentucky for any such offense covered by this Act. Such forms shall be distributed to district and city commonwealth attorneys and made available at all police departments in the Commonwealth to persons hereby affected. Upon filing such form with any Superior Court and a payment of a fee of $10.00, the Court shall liberally construe these provisions to benefit the defendant in furtherance of the amnesty and dismissal provision of this section. Upon the Court’s ruling under this provision the arrest record shall be set aside and be destroyed. Such persons may then truthfully state that they have never been arrested or convicted of any cannabis hemp marijuana related offense which is hereby no longer illegal in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. This shall be deemed to be a finding of factual innocence under Kentucky Penal Code Section 218A.010, et seq.
       3. Law abiding Cannabis Growers and Consumers retain the Right to possess Firearms as granted to them by the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution. For the use of their protection and prosperity which includes hunting.
    III. The legislature is authorized upon thorough investigation, to enact legislation using reasonable standards to:
        1. License concessionary establishments to distribute cannabis hemp euphoric products in a manner analogous to the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s tobacco industry model. Sufficient community outlets shall be licensed to provide reasonable commercial access to persons of legal age, so as to discourage and prevent the misuse of, and illicit traffic in, such products. Any license or permit fee required by the Commonwealth for commercial production, distribution or use shall not exceed $1,000.00 and not more than $500.00 per small farmer or small business.
        2. Place an excise tax on commercial and corporate sale of cannabis hemp euphoric products, analogous to the Commonwealth’s tobacco industry model, so long as no excise tax or combination of excise taxes shall exceed $10.00 per ounce.
        3. Regulate the personal use of cannabis hemp euphoric products in enclosed and/or restricted public places.
        4. Exempt cannabis marijuana hemp from any and all farming tobacco "Base" laws, regulations, codes, statutes, which "restricted" or "limit" number of licenses,… based on science that "does not apply" to the agricultural cultivation, propagation, growth or farming of cannabis marijuana hemp which has been scientifically proven to reclaim, remove toxins and restore soil, ground water and our ozone.  
    IV. Pursuant to the Ninth and Tenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky hereby nullify, repudiate and challenge Federal cannabis hemp marijuana prohibitions that are in conflict with this Act and our Constitutions, both Federal and our Commonwealth’s.
    V. Severability: If any provision of this Act, or the application of any such provision to any person or circumstance, shall be held invalid by any court, the remainder of this Act, to the extent it can be given effect, or the application of such provisions to persons or circumstances other than those as to which it is held invalid, shall not be affected thereby, and to this end the provisions of this Act are severable.
    VI. Construction: If any rival or conflicting initiative regulating any matter addressed by this act receives the higher affirmative vote, then all non-conflicting parts shall become operative.
    VII. Purpose of Act: This Act is an exercise of the police powers of the Commonwealth for the protection of the safety, welfare, health, and peace of the people and the environment of the Commonwealth, to protect the industrial and medicinal uses of cannabis hemp, to eliminate the unlicensed and unlawful cultivation, selling, and dispensing of cannabis hemp; and to encourage temperance in the consumption of cannabis hemp euphoric products. It is hereby declared that the subject matter of this Act involves, in the highest degree, the ecological, economic, social, and moral well-being and safety of the Commonwealth and of all its people. All provisions of this Act shall be liberally construed for the accomplishment of these purposes: to respect human rights, to promote tolerance, to uphold the Constitutions both Federal and the Commonwealth’s and to end cannabis hemp prohibition. To nullify, repeal and challenge the U.N. to end cannabis marijuana hemp prohibition which is half of the worldwide so-called "War on Drugs"created to uphold the interest of Big Chema, Big Pharma, Big Corps and their Synthetic Military Industrial Prison Complex and to uphold the interest of the people and it’s own Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the reasons already stated with-in it.

     

    ***************
    Due to the fact that the Commonwealth of Kentucky doesn’t allow you to simply petition your State Government as in most states. We ask that you Please print or copy, Sign, and forward copies to your local Representative in Congress and our State Senators here with-in the Commonwealth with a note attached reminding them they are paid to represent your interest regardless of whether they agree with them or not. Thank You!
    Written in Honor of the Great Spirit, the universe, the planet and good friends, colleagues, mentors, leaders,… Jack Herer, Gatewood Galbraith, and all who have gone before me and those who will come after us.
    Sincerely,
    Mary Thomas-Spears aka Rev. Mary

     

    PLEASE SIGN PETITION BELOW!  REPEAL CANNABIS PROHIBITION NOW!

     

    Petition2Congress Logo

     
  • ShereeKrider 1:26 am on October 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barren River Lake, Dam,   

    ‘In the best interest of our people’ 


    Barren River No. 2 Dam changed lives, region

     

    'In the best interest of our people'

     

    Posted: Sunday, October 26, 2014 1:00 am

    By CHUCK MASON The Daily News cmason@bgdailynews.com 783-3262 | 1 comment

    LUCAS — When Steve Jackson puts his fishing line into Barren River Lake, his thoughts often gravitate to his grandfather Carl Disman.

    Disman gave up his past so that Jackson and hundreds of thousands of people could have a brighter, safer future in southcentral Kentucky.

    Jackson said when he talks to fellow lake anglers about bass and crappie, he tells them about the great fishing spots in the lake, spots where fish gather in and around the old limestone foundations of the farm buildings once owned by men like his grandfather. It’s all underwater now – tangled tree trunks and stumps and old foundations.

    There’s even an old spring Disman used near his barn. That’s underwater, too.

    Disman was one of nearly 80 property owners who sold their land to the federal government so the property could be flooded by the Barren River No. 2 Dam. Eventually a lake, a state park, lodge and boating facilities would come to Barren and Allen counties, providing a picturesque vacation and camping spot. Jackson recalled Disman’s homestead was one of the last structures condemned to pave the way for the dam project.

    According to news reports at the time, property owners in Barren and Allen counties formed a committee so they could collectively deal with the land sales. A newspaper report of a meeting in February 1960 noted about 150 people attended a meeting at the Allen County Courthouse, 78 of whom would be directly affected by what was being called the Port Oliver Dam.

    That was one of the first significant steps in a lengthy process that led to Barren River No. 2 Dam being dedicated on Sept. 25, 1964. On Saturday, officials celebrated the 50th anniversary of the dam in ceremonies in Barren County.

    To determine why homesteads had to be abandoned and flooded in the first place to create the reservoir, an examination is needed of the rationale for the project. First, there was the unpredictable Barren River, a river that couldn’t be contained within its banks. It had to be tamed for safety and economic reasons. It was dammed to create a reservoir that could launch recreational and economic development opportunities in the region.

    The scrutiny begins

    In 1944, while the United States fought to quell the Germans and the Japanese in World War II in Europe and the Pacific, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers back stateside was studying the Barren River in Kentucky, a study authorized under the federal Flood Control Act of 1941.

    The study showed that 18,340 acres of land in the Barren River flood plain was affected by flooding, taking out 11,005 acres of corn, 3,185 acres of hay, 843 acres of pasture and 3,307 acres of woodlands. Jackson recalls as a boy he saw the Barren River at the Narrows gorged two different times with water that reached the level where the lake rises in elevation today.

    The federal study looked at the flood area below the authorized Barren No. 2 reservoir at river mile marker 79.2 and at the river’s mouth. The 1944 study noted the greater losses to floods occurred during the traditional crop season, April to November. The U.S. Army broke the river watershed into two sections, the first from river mile zero to mile marker 43.7 and the second section from 43.7 to 79.2 to look at flood losses.

    Records compiled by U.S. Rep. William Natcher, D-Bowling Green, which are available in the Natcher Collection at the Kentucky Museum archives, show the congressman several years later was working to shepherd federal legislation about a concept called low-stream flow. The idea was if the water in the river could be slowed down in speed and thus pooled, it would enhance the fish habitat, maintain a healthy temperature for the fish and also control flooding that had affected farm owners in the flood plain.

    The Ohio Valley Improvement Association in Cincinnati, chaired by William Hull, concurred with Natcher’s approach. In a letter to Natcher in 1957, Hull urged Natcher to increase budgeted planning funds for Barren River No. 2 from $50,000 to $150,000 so that construction could be started in fiscal year 1959.

    In a Western Union wire sent to the Daily News publisher in 1958, Natcher was pleased to report that the River and Harbors and Flood Control Omnibus Bill had been approved by the U.S. House of Representatives on March 11, 1958, on a vote of 321-81.

    “It is in the best interest of our people and national security that the regulation to increase low-stream flows be adopted,” Natcher wrote to J. Ray Gaines.

    Turning the earth

    The Barren River dam project progressed to the point where on April 16, 1960, Natcher – an influential member of the House Appropriations Committee – lifted the first spade full of dirt for the project while an estimated 1,000 people watched, including Kentucky’s two U.S. senators, John Sherman Cooper and Thruston Morton. News accounts at the time said the dam was just one of $533 million in water development projects in Kentucky.

    In a pamphlet produced in 1964 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, it noted the dam impounded a reservoir with a minimum pool length of 19 miles and a maximum pool length of 46 miles. That’s a total water storage capacity of 768,600 acre-feet of water. One acre-foot of water equals 325,850 gallons of water.

    The dam had been a long time coming. An act of Congress in June 1938 provided the potential funding for the dam under the Flood Control Act of 1938. However, it took until 1960 before the first shovel of dirt was turned for the 3,970-foot earthen dam which had a total fill of 5,181,326 cubic yards.

    The flood control effort was vital, according to a column in “Kentucky Happy Hunting Ground” written in January 1965 following the 1964 dam dedication ceremony where Natcher and Kentucky Gov. Edward Breathitt spoke.

    “Just last spring rampaging waters along the Ohio River cost Kentuckians damages estimated at $32 million. A great deal of this financial disaster and untold human suffering will be avoided in the future because of dams like this one which are being constructed all over Kentucky,” the column noted.

    News reports in 1960 stated the highest price paid for land was $275 per acre and that the land-buying process was expected to take a couple of years. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had determined that the river valley would be permanently submerged up to the elevation 520 feet above sea level and that the government would purchase land up to the seasonal pool level of 560 feet above sea level. The top flood level elevation would be 590 feet above sea level.

    Jackson, 64, a Barren County resident, said his grandfather resented that he had to give up his farm for the project. “That (farm) was his domain,” Jackson recalled.

    With the eventual development of the lake as a tourism spot, people from Alabama, Illinois, Ohio and other states came to Barren River Lake for fishing tournaments. The dollars they spent boosted the economy in Barren, Allen and Monroe counties.

    Billy Gray, 77, of Barren County, who first came to southcentral Kentucky at age 9, said the dam was a good decision because of the water supply benefits for the region along with the economic development. Gray said when the dam was completed in 1964, he used to take his water storage vehicles down by the lake to obtain free water for his tobacco plants. The edge of the lake was only about a quarter-mile from his house. Health reasons led to Gray quit growing tobacco in 1997.

    Years later, he takes in a Sunday afternoon dinner at the lodge and marvels at the development that has occurred around the lake.

    “I think a lot of people who were opposed to it (initially) think differently now,” he said. He compared the situation to when Interstate 65 was built and those people who had traveled along U.S. 31-W wondered why the new road was needed.

    When Natcher spoke at the 1960 groundbreaking, the Markwell and Hartz construction firm from Memphis, Tenn., had used its bulldozers to knock down a clearing. Then-Kentucky Gov. Bert Combs joined Natcher, Cooper and Morton that April.

    “We’ll keep our children at home and we’ll utilize our natural resources through river development,” Natcher told the crowd, according to news reports. High school bands from Glasgow, Allen County, Butler County and Bowling Green entertained the crowd before the politicians’ speeches, the reports recounted.

    Four years later, when the dam was completed, Natcher shared the speaker duties with Breathitt, and the Bowling Green congressman remained optimistic about the $24.5 million dam’s potential. He said the project was the realization of one of his major dreams as a congressman.

    Natcher said he was reared on a farm in the Barren River basin and that he knew firsthand the “hardship” of floods.

    Col. William Roper of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers told people gathered at the Western Hills Restaurant in Bowling Green that the dam was expected to reduce flood damage by $6 million a year, meaning it would pay for itself in just over a decade, news reports show. The Barren River project was one of four major flood control efforts in southcentral Kentucky: Rough River, Nolin, Barren and Green rivers. Roper said the four projects represented a more than $69 million investment.

    “The primary purpose of the Barren River Reservoir project is flood control,” the 1964 pamphlet from the Army Corps of Engineers noted. “As an integral unit of the comprehensive flood control plan for the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, it will reduce flood stages in the Barren and Green River valleys and all other areas downstream from the dam. The reservoir is maintained at or near minimum pool level during winter months and at seasonal pool level during summer months except when waters are stored for flood control,” the pamphlet noted.

    If you build it, they will come

    With the dam operational, Breathitt told the onlookers in 1964 about a proposed $176 million bond issue planned for November 1965 that would pave the way for a resort lodge and swimming pool, boat dock, picnic, camping and swimming facilities. A new state park was about to be born.

    The money would soon be forthcoming. The first inkling that the larger economic plan was bankrolled was when it was announced in The (Louisville) Courier-Journal in December 1966 that $1,734,000 in federal money from the Land and Water Conservation Fund established by Congress in 1965 – where fees paid at federal recreation facilities were being distributed to the states – was approved for the project.

    The state of Kentucky matched the $1.7 million from the federal government with $1,230,000 realized by a sale of revenue bonds and $724,255 earned from the approved 1965 local bond issue.

    By the time the 25th anniversary of Barren River State Resort Park and celebration of the Louis B. Nunn Lodge occurred in 1996 – named for the former Kentucky governor and native of Barren County in 1971 – the complex had become a vibrant part of the community. It had been a long time since the Barren River Valley Development League and public officials had heralded the potential that the dam could bring to the area in their 1964 speeches.

    The $3.7 million Kentucky state park generated millions of tourism dollars, a fact not lost on Jackson, who said he, his children and grandchildren benefit from his grandfather’s decision to give up the farm.

    Under the water lay those building foundations, former Native American hunting spots and the area that settlers in the 1700s claimed was “barren” because of a lack of trees in the topography, the trees razed to provide grazing areas for buffalo.

    Not all the history, though has been overwhelmed by water.

    According to the state park’s website, Port Oliver, near the dam, was formerly called Port Oliver Ford, and was the site of a brine-well field for producing table salt. Baileys Point Recreation Area was the site of an antebellum farmhouse, built by early settlers to the area who went by the name of Foster. The website also noted that a family cemetery remains with gravestones and stone vaults that date back to the early 1800s.

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers noted it is the largest federal provider of outdoor and water-based recreation in the nation and hosts more than 350 million visits each year at its lakes, beaches and other areas. Corps lands and waters provide about 4,500 miles of trails, 3,400 boat launch ramps and 33 percent of all U.S. freshwater fishing.

    — Follow reporter Chuck Mason on Twitter at twitter.com/bgdnschools or visit bgdailynews.com.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:52 am on October 19, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Adolf Hitler, Breaking Bad, Crystal Meth, Germany, Hitler, Israel, Nazi   

    Report: Hitler was on crystal meth 


    AP Travel Trip Hitlers Munich

    (NEWSER) – Adolf Hitler apparently relied on a stunning array of drugs while ruling Nazi Germany, including one made popular by the show Breaking Bad: crystal meth.

    According to a 47-page U.S. military dossier, a physician filled the Fuhrer with barbiturate tranquilizers, morphine, bulls’ semen, a pill that contained crystal meth, and other drugs, depending on Hitler’s momentary needs, the Daily Mail reports. By this account, Hitler downed crystal meth before a 1943 meeting with Mussolini in which the Fuhrer ranted for two hours, and took nine shots of methamphetamine while living out his last days in his bunker.

    The dossier’s allegations will be considered in a British TV documentary this weekend called Hitler’s Hidden Drug Habit, the Times of Israel reports.

    Just who was Hitler’s dealer? Named Theodor Morell, he succeeded as a Berlin doctor despite his unconventional methods and controversial past. Revelations that he had treated Jews hurt his business in 1933, and many thought he appeared Jewish; Hitler’s inner circle disliked both his appearance and his practices, according to the Times. A U.S. collector who found the dossier also criticized Morell, calling him "a quack and a fraud and a snake oil salesman." Yet Hitler trusted him until the Nazis fell in 1945.

    Hitler’s alleged use of other drugs, like cocaine and amphetamines, has already been documented — the International Business Times mentions two documentaries that cover it — but his apparent reliance on 74 drugs, including crystal meth, adds to the portrait of a hypochondriac ruling Nazi Germany while high.

    (Another recent documentary alleges that Hitler was a billionaire tax dodger.)

    This article originally appeared on Newser: Report: Hitler Was on Crystal Meth

     

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:27 pm on August 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    14TH ANNUAL GLOBAL FEST IN THE BARRENS RETURNS SEPTEMBER 6, 2014 


     

    Sunday, 17 August 2014 12:44

    The 14th annual Global Fest in the Barrens (www.barrenglobalfest.com) returns to Glasgow-Barren County on Saturday, September 6, 2014 from 10:00 A.M. To 5:00 P.M. held on the Glasgow Public Square in Glasgow, Kentucky.  Global Fest is a Celebration of World Cultures and American Unity that promotes interaction among diverse individuals by discovering their similarities and differences. A fun filled day promoting Education, Entertainment, Children’s Activities, sharing and enjoying the Diversity in our community. New this year is recognition of Global Fest Deceased Members. We also welcome Pleasant Valley Baptist, Uno who will sponsor International Games and Crafts for youth and Caveland Church who will sponsor Children’s activities. New entertainment this year is Plain Jane Rock Band, Hector Montenegro, and the Head Liner this year is Perfect Fit Band.

    Brother Jordan Woodie from Coral Hill Baptist will provide the Invocation and Julie Ann will sing the National Anthem.

    Kentucky Music will provide the Sound System that will fill the air with Gospel Music provided by the Nesbitt Family from Tennessee.  Country Music will be provided by Silver Eagle Band, Author Hatfield and Buck Creek, will provide Blue Grass Music,

    Hector Montenegro will sing love songs.

    The Head liner this year is Perfect Fit who will present a Genre of R&B, Motown, Blues and Top Hits.

    Omega Force Worlds Famous Strong Team will deliver a message of hope.

    Sisters with Praise will deliver a message through song and dance.

    Children’s World (next to Commonwealth Broadway Building) is sponsored by Glasgow Barren Co. Tourist and Convention Commission, Boys and Girls Club, Big Brother & Big Sister, Pleasant Valley Baptist of Uno, and Cave Land Church. Children will talk to Sponge Bob and Dora the Explorer look a likes. Broadway the Clown will entertain the children with balloons and candy. The Zippy Pets, Train Ride and Bungee Bounce Jump will return this year. Activities for the children will include Face painting, Inflatable, Piñata Burst, and International Crafts and Games.

    Cultural Educational Exhibits include: African American, American, African, Chinese,  Japan, Mexican, Native Americans Indians, Nicaragua, Philippine, Thailand, German, Italian, Bosnian and Cambodian, French, and Spanish.   Movies of World Cultures will be showing at George J’s. Passports and Stamps will be available in the Gazebo near the stage.  A prize will be given away to the person who collects all the stamps in the Passport.

    Tasty Cuisine will be provided by:  B&D BBQ, New Orleans Style Snowball & BBQ, Tater BBQ, C & D BBQ, Shogun- Japanese, Anna’s Greek Restaurant – Greek, Backyard Party Creation- Carnival food, and Papa John’s Pizza, La Nacional-Mexican Food and Horse Cave Baptist Church Male Ministry-Fish, George J’s Diner-French.

    Support Local Glasgow Downtown Businesses. Global Fest welcomes two new restaurants in downtown Glasgow, Shogun and Miqueals Bistro.

    The information desk is located on the right of the main stage. Register for door prizes, festival schedule information and Tourist Travel Logs.

    Global Fest is a Free Family Community Festival.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:00 pm on August 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ballot positions,   

    A PLACE ON THE BALLOT, Thursday’s drawing decides name order for nonpartisan candidates 


    Posted: Thursday, August 14, 2014 10:34 pm

    BY MELINDA J. OVERSTREET Glasgow Daily Times

    Candidates in nonpartisan races participated Thursday in a drawing to determine ballot positions for the Nov. 4 general election.

    The drawing was at the Kentucky secretary of state’s office for candidates who filed there, but each county also had a drawing for local candidates in municipal and school board races.

    Proceeding one race at a time, candidates or their proxies drew a number in the order in which they filed to run for their respective offices. In the order indicated by that number, each person then drew another number that determined the ballot position. Anyone who was not present and did not have a proxy designated and submitted by the time the drawing began automatically got the bottom spot on the list.

    The party listed first on the ballot for partisan races is determined at the secretary of state’s office according to state law, said Amanda Sturgeon, elections coordinator in the Barren County Clerk’s Office, after the drawings had concluded.

    The Caverna Independent Schools district is in both Barren and Hart counties, so the clerks in those counties decide which county will have the drawing to determine ballot positions for board of education candidates in both counties, Sturgeon said. On Thursday, the drawing was in Barren County.

    Voters residing within that school district in either county can vote for any of the six candidates, regardless of the candidates’ counties of residence.

    Drawings did not take place Thursday for races with only enough candidates to fill the available seats – such as the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education, which has three slots and three candidates.

    The ballot positions determined in Thursday’s drawing – in the order of the drawings – in the Fiscal Court Chambers in the Barren County Government Center are:

    Glasgow City Council

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:12 am on July 2, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Medical staff warned: Keep your mouths shut about illegal immigrants or face arrest 


    By Todd Starnes

    Published July 02, 2014

     

    A government-contracted security force threatened to arrest doctors and nurses if they divulged any information about the contagion threat at a refugee camp housing illegal alien children at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, sources say.

    In spite of the threat, several former camp workers broke their confidentiality agreements and shared exclusive details with me about the dangerous conditions at the camp. They said taxpayers deserve to know about the contagious diseases and the risks the children pose to Americans. I have agreed to not to disclose their identities because they fear retaliation and prosecution.

    My sources say Americans should be very concerned about the secrecy of the government camps.

    “There were several of us who wanted to talk about the camps, but the agents made it clear we would be arrested,” a psychiatric counselor told me. “We were under orders not to say anything.”

    The sources said workers were guarded by a security force from the Baptist Family & Children’s Services, which the Department of Health and Human Services hired to run the Lackland Camp.

    The sources say security forces called themselves the “Brown Shirts.”

    “It was a very submissive atmosphere,” the counselor said. “Once you stepped onto the grounds, you abided by their laws – the Brown Shirt laws.”

    She said the workers were stripped of their cellphones and other communication devices. Anyone caught with a phone was immediately fired.

    “Everyone was paranoid,” she said. “The children had more rights than the workers.”

    She said children in the camp had measles, scabies, chicken pox and strep throat as well as mental and emotional issues.

    “It was not a good atmosphere in terms of health,” she said. “I would be talking to children and lice would just be climbing down their hair.”

    A former nurse at the camp told me she was horrified by what she saw.

    “We have so many kids coming in that there was no way to control all of the sickness – all this stuff coming into the country,” she said. “We were very concerned at one point about strep going around the base.”

    Both the counselor and the nurse said their superiors tried to cover up the extent of the illnesses.

    “When they found out the kids had scabies, the charge nurse was adamant – ‘Don’t mention that. Don’t say scabies,’” the nurse recounted. “But everybody knew they had scabies. Some of the workers were very concerned about touching things and picking things up. They asked if they should be concerned, but they were told don’t worry about it.”

    The nurse said the lice issue was epidemic – but everything was kept “hush-hush.”

    “You could see the bugs crawling through their hair,” she said. “After we would rinse out their hair, the sink would be loaded with black bugs.”

    The nurse told me she became especially alarmed because their files indicated the children had been transported to Lackland on domestic charter buses and airplanes.

    “That’s what alerted me,” she said. “Oh, my God. They’re flying these kids around. Nobody knows that these children have scabies and lice. To tell you the truth, there’s no way to control it.”

    I don’t mean to upset anyone’s Independence Day vacation plans, but were these kids transported to the camps before or after they were deloused? Anyone who flies the friendly skies could be facing a public health concern. 

    The counselor told me the refugee camp resembled a giant emergency room – off limits to the public.

    “They did not want the community to know,” she said. “I initially spoke out at Lackland because I had a concern the children’s mental health care was not being taken care of.”

    She said the breaking point came when camp officials refused to hospitalize several children who were suicidal.

    “I made a recommendation that a child needed to be sent to a psychiatric unit,” the counselor told me. “He was reaching psychosis. He was suicidal. Instead of treating him, they sent him off to a family in the United States.”

    She said she filed a Child Protective Services report and quit her job.

    “I didn’t want to lose my license if this kid committed suicide,” she told me. “I was done.”

    The counselor kept a detailed journal about what happened during her tenure at the facility.

    “When people read that journal they are going to be astonished,” she said. ‘I don’t think they will believe what is going on in America.”

    So it was not a great surprise, she said, when she received a call from federal agents demanding that she return to the military base and hand over her journal.

    She said she declined to do so.

    “I didn’t go back to Lackland,” she said.

    Both workers told me while they have no regrets, they want to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals.

    “They’re going to crush the system,” the nurse told me. “We can’t sustain this. They are overwhelming the system and I think it’s a travesty.”

    Baptist Family & Childen’s Services spokeswoman Krista Piferrer tells me the agency takes “any allegation of malfeasance or inappropriate care of a child very seriously.”

    “There are a number of checks and balances to ensure children are receiving appropriate and adequate mental health care,” she said.

    Piferrer said the clinicians are supervised by a federal field specialist from HHS’s Office of Refugee Resettlement. She also said BFCS have 58 medical professionals serving at Lackland.

    “Every illness, whether it is a headache or something more serious, is recorded in a child’s electronic medical record and posted on WebEOC – a real-time, web-based platform that is visible to not only BFCS but the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,” she said.

    As for those brown shirts, the BFCS said they are “incident management team personnel” – who happen to wear tan shirts.

    My sources say Americans should be very concerned about the secrecy of the government camps.

    “This is just the beginning,” one source told me. "It is a long-term financial responsibility.”

    Todd Starnes is host of Fox News & Commentary, heard on hundreds of radio stations. Sign up for his American Dispatch newsletter, be sure to join his Facebook page, and follow him on Twitter. His latest book is "God Less America”.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 6:43 pm on June 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: black lung, , coal miners,   


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/29/black-lung-disease-kentucky-coal-dust_n_5368878.html

    The War On Coal Miners: How Companies Hide The Threat Of Black Lung From Watchdogs And Workers

     
  • ShereeKrider 4:32 pm on June 19, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , LG&E,   


    http://fatlip.leoweekly.com/2012/04/18/lge-settles-with-apcd-but-coal-ash-still-flying-on-cane-run-road/

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:45 pm on June 19, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Glasgow, Guy Turcotte, Jarrod Steele, Joseph Ford, Metcalfe County, Sheriff   

    2-year DVO issued against Glasgow police sergeant 


    Posted: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 11:16 am

    By the Daily News |

    A Metcalfe County judge issued a domestic violence order of protection against Glasgow Police Department Sgt. Jarrod Steele, department spokeswoman Julie Anne Williams said.

    The order is in place for two years and prohibits Steele from possession of any guns while not on police duty, Williams said.

    Glasgow Police Chief Guy Turcotte put Steele on paid administrative leave until further notice.

    This is the second Glasgow officer in two weeks to face domestic violence accusations.

    Officer Joseph Ford’s estranged wife, Katja Ford, 38, filed June 10 for an emergency protective order, Barren Circuit Court records show. The following day, she filed for divorce. 

    The file containing the protection order is not open for public inspection. Kentucky State Police served a domestic violence summons on Ford earlier.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:27 pm on June 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2015, Area 51, , Governors, Operation Blue Star   

    Developing: 98% of Americans Will Be Impacted By Secret Military Base (Must See Video) 


    By MONEY MORNING STAFF REPORTS

    Until now, Operation BlueStar has been kept hidden from the public by members of Congress, governors of four states, and major silicon heavyweights.

    But by the end of 2015, it’s set to impact 98% of the U.S. population.

    Initially, Operation BlueStar is expected to disrupt $737 billion of the U.S. economy. And that’s just the beginning.

    Forbes describes the end game of what’s been put in motion as “world-changing.”

    See More: Robinson reveals the exact location of Operation BlueStar, which military experts have dubbed the “New Area 51.” Once you see what’s going to be built there, you’ll understand why this has been kept so secret. Click here for more.

    The top military think tank, the Rocky Mountain Institute, described its impact as the equivalent of “reinventing fire.”

    Yet, few Americans have any idea what Operation BlueStar is, or how it’s about to transform this country. That’s why 34-year Silicon Valley insider Michael Robinson performed his own investigation into it.

    Robinson says there’s an “economic war” brewing among the states trying to control Operation BlueStar.


    If you live near one of these hotspots, you must look at this.

    The stakes couldn’t be higher—the potential to control $737 billion of the U.S. economy and impact 8 million jobs.

    Robinson’s research has led him to four states in particular that are at the center of this project.

    And he’s found the exact location of this secretive military project, which is projected to be 1,000 acres and include a 10-million square foot facility.

    Robinson isn’t the only one investigating Operation BlueStar.

    Morgan Stanley released its own report on the project and determined that, "We are witnessing the most disruptive intersection of manufacturing, innovation and capital experienced in more than a century."

    Wired Magazine believes this is starting a “truly transformative revolution.”

    At 10-million square feet – or about the size of 174 football fields – the production facility alone will be enormous.

    Editor’s Note: For full access to Robinson’s research on Operation BlueStar, what it’s all about, and how it will radically impact your life, go here.

     
  • ShereeKrider 8:34 pm on June 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Female, , Litigators   


    Seven Ky. attorneys named among Top 250 Women in Litigation

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (June 17, 2014) — Seven Kentucky attorneys recently were named to the 2014 edition of Benchmark: Top 250 Women in Litigation. The annual publication honors female litigators from around the country for their achievements in the field.
    gavel

    Benchmark: Top 250 Women in Litigation honors female litigators from around the country for their achievements in the field.

    Those named to the list include

    http://www.lanereport.com/32917/2014/06/seven-ky-attorneys-named-among-top-250-women-in-litigation/

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:56 pm on June 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    What has GW Pharma been up to lately? 


    HERE IT IS!

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:08 pm on June 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: counties, , map   

    KENTUCKY COUNTIES MAP 


    Kentucky Counties Map

    Kentucky Counties Map

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:21 pm on June 6, 2014 Permalink | Reply  


    http://www.examiner.net/article/20140606/NEWS/140609284

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:03 pm on June 6, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Lexington jail sergeant pleads not guilty to sodomy, sexual abuse charges 


    A not guilty plea was entered Friday on behalf of a Fayette County jail sergeant charged with sodomy and sexual abuse.

    Sgt. John Thomas Lowe, 39, appeared in district court for an arraignment. Lowe, wearing a a black suit, stayed quiet as his lawyer spoke for him. He is charged with two counts of first-degree sodomy and one count of sexual abuse.

    Lexington police arrested Lowe Thursday. He was placed in protective custody at the detention center, but was released after posting a $20,000 full cash bond.

    Lowe, who has worked at the jail since 2002, was placed on administrative leave without pay pending the outcome of the criminal investigation.

    He is scheduled to appear in court June 26 for a preliminary hearing.

    Justin Madden: (859) 231-3197. Twitter: @HLpublicsafety

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:57 am on May 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: beer, , louisvillle, oertels beer   

    Oertels Beer returns to Louisville 


    by Chelsea Rabideau

    WHAS11.com

    Posted on May 11, 2014 at 12:05 AM

    Updated yesterday at 12:06 AM

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. – One brewery is bringing back a hoppy bit of beer history. Apocalypse Brew Works is digging in the archives to re-introduce the Oertels 92 brand.

    It’s the first pint to be pulled in decades of Oertels 1912, a dark cream ale brewed in Louisville. “It was actually Louisville’s first beer. Then all the other, Fehr’s, Falls City, and what not, came after it,” said Danny Barhorst. His family owns the Oertels recipes. He and his mother, Jan Schnur come from a brewing family. “Our family comes from a long line of, a deep background of brewers actually,” explained Barhorst, “My grandfather bootlegged beer from Texas to St. Louis.”

    In 1992, the family tried to bring Oertels back in Louisville, but the deal fell through. Since then, Jan has held onto the trademarked name and recipe, waiting for the perfect opportunity. “For the last 22 years, I have been hoping to do something like this,” she said.

    They found the partner they’d been waiting for in Apocalypse head brewer Leah Dienes. “We’re just grateful to bring these old recipes back to life,” she said. Dienes did her research before beginning to brew. “We have copies of the original brew logs,” she explained of their process. No detail was overlooked, from the hops that would’ve been available in Oertels’ original hay day over 100 years ago, to the perfect coloring. Seven months later, Oertels made the long awaited comeback.

    Dienes says she hopes to brew some of the other Oertels recipes, as long as Jan will let her. The Oertels 1912 is meant to be a warm weather ale, so the comeback was timed just right.

    http://www.whas11.com/news/Oertels-Beer-returns-to-Louisville-258784991.html

     
  • ShereeKrider 11:55 am on May 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Discarded heroin needles lead to cleanup effort 


    Associated Press

    Posted on May 10, 2014 at 4:34 PM

    COVINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A drug recovery advocacy group says it is organizing heroin syringe cleanups in Northern Kentucky.

    The Kentucky Enquirer reports (http://cin.ci/1legXB5 ) Northern Kentucky residents have spotted used hypodermic needles in parking lots, tree lawns, front yards and alleys. Officials say heroin addicts discard the needles after using them, and the syringes could cause health problems like hepatitis and HIV.

    http://www.whas11.com/news/local/258766001.html

     
  • ShereeKrider 12:42 pm on May 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , legalization, ,   


    A CONVERSATION WITH K4MM

    Mark L Bradley
    May 1 at 6:46pm

    I am not trying to start crap but if you support medicinal marijuana, or even full legalization we must unite. I have been to Frankfort 3 times and each time the people i ran into lobbying for us were all from ky4mm. We can have as many pages and such but we all must have one in common and it needs to be ky4mm. We are lobbying on a regular basis for us all but we need support of all to get anything accomplished. This last session we got our bill further than any marijuana bill has been and i feel confident with a consolidation of groups we can win next session as we need more than just our group calling for them to recognize change. It is baby steps to this point because we are split but if everyone will follow my lead we will win. There is no doubt in my mind. Its all about unity especially when dealing with government bs.
    Like · · Share

    Seen by 16
    Mark L Bradley facebook page for ky4mm is Kentuckians for medicinal marijuna
    May 1 at 6:59pm · Like
    Sheree Krider Yeah, I admin that group too. And I feel what you are saying. But as far as I am concerned, REPEAL is the only safe way to go for the people to be free of prosecution from “marijuana law” – even if it IS legalized. Look what is happening in Canada, and in “legal” states such as Colorado….if it isn’t the state prosecuting for some ridiculous reason it’s the Feds RAIDing dispensaries and patients. Do you really want to deal with that just to have a written law on the books that says “medical marijuana” is legal? I BELIEVE IN MEDICAL MJ also – I have used it most of my life. But I also believe in our right to freedom from persecution of a plant….. ANY plant….If they can take one plant out of our garden they can take them all and that isn’t acceptable. If they told you it was illegal to grow corn and green beans on your property, or CATNIP, or OREGANO, what would you think? It is perfectly fine for Pharma’s to make meds out of this plant – IT IS NOT FINE FOR THEM TO TELL ME I CAN’T HAVE IT IN MY GARDEN…and if they do legalize MJ in Ky that is what will happen if we keep on with it in the way we are now. Have you noticed what they are doing with hemp legalization? A corp came in and bought up property and is going to plant hemp on it. NOT our farmer’s….http://kentuckymarijuanaparty.org/…/179-polaris… LET KENTUCKY BE THE FIRST STATE TO DO IT RIGHT! Oh yeah, I forgot – they decided to let Veterans “plant the seed”…..http://kentuckymarijuanaparty.org/…/179-polaris… Think about all this and let me know what everyone wants!
    Polaris International Holdings Enters Joint Venture for Kentucky Hemp Project
    kentuckymarijuanaparty.org
    U.S. Marijuana Party of Kentucky

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:15 pm on May 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: death penalty, execution, moratorium   

    It’s time for the US supreme court to declare a death penalty moratorium 


    Clayton Lockett’s agonizing final minutes were the results of a failed experiment, proving states can no longer be trusted to run their laboratories. Let’s stop tinkering with the machinery of death

    lethal injection chamber In 1972, the supreme court issued a moratorium after determining that the death penalty was being imposed in an arbitrary and capricious manner. What’s happening now is certainly capricious. Photograph: T Woodard / Flickr via Creative Commons

    My recollections of the one execution I attended amount to memories of a ghastly, surrealistic encounter with justice. The condemned prisoner lay covered with a sheet, which hid from the witnesses the intravenous lines threaded into both of his arms.

    Sitting just a few yards away, I held the hand of his wife, who wept, prayed and spoke in tongues as the ritualistic killing unfolded. The inmate said goodbye to her, to his lawyers, to his spiritual advisors. Then the series of poisons entered his bloodstream, and he breathed in a labored manner, gradually turning a deep purple, and died.

    In all respects it was a calm, orderly, cold-blooded and super-premeditated killing of one human being by another. Stripped of the sanction of law, the execution could have served as a perfect example of first-degree murder, punishable by death in 32 states in America.

    Needless to say, the execution of that man, in 1995, was vastly different from Oklahoma’s ghoulishly botched attempt to execute Clayton Lockett on Tuesday night.

    As the world is now well aware, my state’s effort to execute two prisoners in the same day for the first time since 1937 turned into a horrible miscarriage. We should have seen it coming, of course, as the secrecy and the scarcity of the drug cocktail in the execution mixed with the bickering and the borderline constitutional crisis in the halls of Oklahoma government, where all hell was breaking loose. Until, that is, hell came to the death chamber.

    Lockett’s body twitched before he attempted to sit up, began to nod, mumbled and writhed, was injected with a failed sedative, revived, then suffered a "vein failure", and died, of a massive heart attack, nearly 45 minutes later.

    Botched lethal injections are hardly rare, and the protocols and drugs used vary from state to state – from a gasping inmate in Ohio, to the Oklahoma man whose last words were "my whole body is burning", to Texas and Florida and beyond.

    In 1972, the US supreme court declared a moratorium on executions after determining that the death penalty was being imposed in an arbitrary and capricious manner. The lack of standards in capital cases caused the high court to equate being sentenced to death to being struck by lightning.

    When the supreme court reinstated the death penalty four years later, it didn’t establish a one-size-fits-all process for capital cases. Instead, as is true of criminal justice in general, the court recognized that states were free to craft their own death penalty procedures, and each state could serve as a laboratory.

    By submitting different processes to the crucible of adversary testing at the state level, the legal thinking went, surely the best and most reliable decisions about who deserved to die would be made – of course the most humane method of execution would emerge. The past 38 years have demonstrated that this undeniably laudable goal, to let America’s laboratories of democracy kill as they see fit, has been far from realized.

    The constitutional prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment, as understood by the 2008 US supreme court decision in Baze v Rees, is designed to prevent the gratuitous infliction of unnecessary pain and suffering on those each state seeks to kill. The notion, again, appears to be that states which choose to kill killers should endeavor to occupy a higher moral plane than those whose crimes have merited their extermination.

    However, as execution drugs become increasingly scarce, death states are forced to experiment with substitute drugs, to tinker with dosages, to rely on questionable suppliers. Shielding these drugs and their sources from public scrutiny greatly enhances the risk of an unnecessarily painful and consequently unconstitutional execution.

    In a tragic sense, Clayton Lockett’s agonizing death was the result of a failed experiment. He was convicted of shooting of 19-year-old Stephanie Neiman and reportedly watched as accomplices buried her alive, but justice requires better than bad chemistry. Given that lethal injection is the execution method in all 32 death states, as well as the military and federal government, we can expect that other human science experiments will result in unconstitutional executions.

    Now is the time to ask: what progress has really been made since the supreme court’s short-lived moratorium on executions? Today, blacks, who comprise roughly 13% of the American population, account for 42% of the death row population. Since 1973, around 140 prisoners have been released from death row with evidence of their innocence. The death penalty remains a punishment most likely to be imposed in cases involving poor minority defendants accused of killing white victims.

    Governors in two death penalty states – Washington and Oregon – have imposed moratoriums on executions. Five other states (Kansas, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Mexico) have either performed no executions or have only executed volunteers.

    The former supreme court Justice Harry Blackmun was right about what he said way back in 1994: the time "to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed" and to "stop tinker[ing] with the machinery of death" is long overdue.

    Now is the time for the supreme court to step in, once again, and impose a nationwide moratorium on executions. These justices may never end capital punishment themselves, but America has more than enough reasons for pause. When the majority of death sentences are reversed, the efficacy of the entire capital punishment system gets called into question. A majority of justices agree that the death penalty does not deter would-be killers. In economic terms, death penalty cases are far more expensive than cases which result in life without parole sentences.

    The exercise by a state of its most awesome power – the power to deprive a citizen of his life – must be accompanied by due process and complete transparency. A government which seeks to kill its citizens by way of a process veiled in secret – that is a government which does not deliver justice.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 7:06 pm on May 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply  


    http://www.whas11.com/news/Ex-Cornbread-Mafia-member-gets-presidential-pardon-134635228.html

     
  • ShereeKrider 4:17 pm on May 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply  


    damn-right-old-guy-in-a-wheelc.jpg

     
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