The Science of Toxicology and U.I. or "Under the Influence and/or Intoxication?" of Cannabis/Marijuana and D.O.A. Drug Testing


The Official Court Documents that I present to you below here, {THIS ONE TIME, FOR FREE = this offer will not last and is for a limited amount of time = THIS SET OF DOCUMENTS WILL GO MISSING AND A FEE WILL BE CHARGED LATER FOR THIS INFORMATION} The following Documents were presented, accepted and registered by the Criminal or Courts as "Evidence" as they were listed by the Kentucky Courts in a case I recently Advocated in on behalf of James E. Coleman.
Are in fact, the PROOF, that Cannabis/Marijuana/Hemp or Unspecified levels of Cannabinoids are natural within the human body and that their presence or levels or "analytical threshold" combined with the fact that this test measures "no quantification of a specific compound" in the blood, are proof, there has been no measure of  intoxication, performed by this test where cannabiniods are concerned and that this test can not show toxicity.
According to this Expert Witness.
Therefore they are unable to test levels for intoxication as they claim is claimed by the manufacture of the test and/or Law Enforcement in U.I. charges or related cases. These documented facts apply to the Test it’s self given and the Cannabinoid levels… Therefore apply to all these D.O.A. = "Drug of Abuse" Blood Serum U.I. Test used by Law Enforcement and Not the Individual. As these facts apply to all humans and all these Test.




The reality of addiction…

Eva Holland

Yesterday at 1:38pm · Instagram ·

I’m sure this photo makes a lot of people uncomfortable it may even piss a few people off but the main reason I took it was to show the reality of addiction. If you don’t choose recovery every single day this will be your only way out. No parent should have to bury their child and no child as young as ours should have to bury their parent. This was preventable it didn’t have to happen but one wrong choice destroyed his family. I know a lot of people may be upset I’m putting it out in the open like This but hiding the facts is only going to keep this epidemic going. The cold hard truth is heroin kills. You may think it will never happen to you but guess what that’s what Mike thought too. We were together 11 years. I was there before it all started. I knew what he wanted out of this life, all his hopes and dreams. He never would’ve imagined his life would turn out this way. He was once so happy and full of life. He was a great son, brother, friend but most importantly he was a great dad. He loved those kids more than anything. But as we all know sometimes life gets tough and we make some wrong choices. His addiction started off with pain pills then inevitably heroin. He loved us all so much he decided enough was enough and went to rehab at the end of last year. He got out right before Christmas as a brand new man. He had found His purpose for living again, he found his gorgeous smile again, he became the man, the son, the brother, the dad that we all needed him to be again. He did so good for so long but then a couple months ago It started with a single pill for a "tooth ache" which inevitably lead him back down the road of addiction instead of staying the coarse of recovery. He said he could handle it, that he could stop on his own and didn’t need to get help again. Well he was wrong, last Wednesday he took his last breath. My kids father, the man I loved since I was a kid, a great son and a great person lost his battle. I just needed to share his story in case it can help anyone else.

Eva Holland's photo.

$7.5 million of marijuana seized in Southern Indiana


By Hannah Alani

After a two-week investigation, police have seized an estimated street value of $7.5 million of marijuana in southern Indiana. “Operation Smoke Out,” a collaborative effort by the Indiana State Police, the Indiana National Guard and local law enforcement, lasted from Aug. 17 through Aug. 28, according to a state police press release.

Through federal grant programs funded through the Domestic Cannabis Eradication and Suppression Program, law enforcement was able to use aircraft support to make “Operation Smoke Out” a success, according to the release.

On Tuesday, as a result of the investigation, Dubois County Sheriff’s Department deputies and state police eradicated approximately 269 marijuana plants in southwestern Dubois County, according to a news article from the Dubois County Herald.

Even though the street value of the marijuana reached into the millions, Dubois County Sheriff’s Department Narcotics Officer John Anderson said it was all for personal use, and not for sale.

“This was someone’s personal harvest,” Anderson said. “They were probably growing enough to last them through the winter.”

He noted that each plant is valued at around a thousand dollars each, so it doesn’t take much crop to have high estimated monetary value.

“What you have up at IU is probably a lot of medical grade coming in from Colorado,” he said, explaining that the drugs were likely not destined for Bloomington.

“Operation Smoke Out” was a proactive response to criminal intelligence of illegal drug trafficking operations growing marijuana on public property such as the Hoosier National Forest and other remote state and federally owned property, according to the release.

With the combined efforts and resource sharing, a large portion of southern Indiana was “scoured by aircraft surveillance.”

In making daily discoveries of illegal marijuana growth operations, a total of 4,898 plants were found across the 146 locations.

Sixteen people were arrested throughout the course of the operation, and officers seized more than four pounds of processed marijuana, six weapons, $3,000 and a methamphetamine lab. Officers said they hope information obtained during these two weeks will result in additional arrests, according to the release.

The Indiana State Police Marijuana Eradication Section is soliciting help from Indiana residents to combat illegal drug activity in Indiana.


The Cannabiterians and the cops



Charlie Doss stood outside his house on South Rural Street and watched the cops rumble by on their motorcycles.
“You’d think they were gettin’ ready for World War Three,” he muttered. The police presence in his neighborhood was making Charlie cranky.
“What’s the big fuckin’ deal?” he announced.
Roughly two dozen patrol cars and a mobile IMPD unit sat at the ready in the parking lot of the Carpenters Local Union building two blocks from the First Church of Cannabis. Officers seemed to be everywhere; on foot, on bicycles — like so many other cities in America in recent years, Indy’s police department looked less like a group of peacekeeping constables and more like an occupying force.
IMPD was out in strength for the opening services of Bill Levin’s brainchild, the First Church of Cannabis, an “unintended consequence” of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration law. After gaining tax-exempt status from the IRS, Bill had planned his inaugural ceremony for the day the law went into effect — July 1, 2015.
Bill had initially stated that his congregants would partake of their sacrament — weed — at the end of the service.
Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry had responded to Bill’s intentions with a press conference. Curry expressed monumental frustration with the Indiana legislature, but made it clear IMPD would have all the plastic cuffs it needed: “Anyone caught in possession of marijuana will be subject to arrest … anyone caught giving marijuana to another individual will be subject to arrest for dealing.”
And further, as NUVO’s Amber Stearns reported on June 26:
Curry outlined all of the potential causes for arrest at the church service. Anyone attending the service, if marijuana is present, could be subject to arrest for probation violation or for visiting a common nuisance even if they choose not to partake in the church’s “sacrament.” Anyone who tries to drive away from the church while high is subject to arrest for operating under the influence. Any and all possible criminal code violations will be enforced. He also stressed that no minor child should be in the vicinity of the church.

Worried about a mass bust — including those who simply might’ve shown up to sing and not smoke — Levin prohibited weed at the church for the July 1 services. 



City-County Councilor voices concern over city’s response to First Church of Cannabis
Posted By Amber Stearns @AmberLStearns on Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 4:00 PM

IMPD was present in large numbers at the inaugural service of the FIrst Church of Cannabis. - PHOTO BY ED WENCK

Indianapolis City- County Councilor Zach Adamson issued a statement calling into question the actions of the city and specifically the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department in their response to the First Church of Cannabis.

The church held their first service Wednesday at noon following the enactment of the state’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Adamson says the views expressed in his statement are his own and are not meant to reflect the sentiment of the entire council.

Adamson’s statement reads as follows:

Yesterday, as Hoosiers watched as several new state laws took effect, one issue of particular local interest has been a bit more high profile in the news. Specifically, The First Church of Cannabis, as they push the limits of the liberties the state says they wanted to protect.

Sadly, more than the reaction of the state, the OVER-reaction by local authorities has been of greater disappointment. Indianapolis residents have watched over the weeks as the media wars on both side of the issue have battled it out on both mainstream and social media.

“I’ve been very troubled by the reaction by our city and the by and large overreaction by our police chief, who actually compared this religious institution’s leader to Jim Jones. That’s a jaw-dropping comparison to a horrific crime and it is an insult to the lives that were lost in that tragedy. It is even more disappointing to see this overreaction using scarce public safety resources during a time of great need in our neighborhoods”, said City-County Councilor Zach Adamson.

Adamson continued, “Many residents have rightfully raised concerns about the city’s inappropriate use of taxpayer resources to fund harassment of this minority religious group. After reading several media reports of selective enforcement of municipal ordinances, the undue installation of police surveillance cameras – at a time when so many of our areas hardest hit by crime don’t have such attention – and the literal recruitment of opposition protesters by the mayors IMPD chief, many fear that Chief Hite’s actions have exposed the City of Indianapolis to expensive and preventable civil liabilities for violations of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, among others.

As our city saw with yesterday morning’s homicide on the near northwest side, we need more officers on the streets and more dollars for neighborhood policing strategies – not unwarranted harassment.”

The Council intends to take all possible actions to give IMPD the necessary tools they need to prioritize enforcement and we hope that we can pull back this encroachment onto the religious freedom of our residents. We call on the public safety agencies to allocate the officers and cameras where our residents have, for years, been begging for them and stop this highly inappropriate use of scarce taxpayer resources. We also call on Chief Hite to issue an immediate apology for the inappropriate invoking of the Jonestown Massacre.





The Washington Times reported on 6/26/15 that the Federal Government is "fast tracking" Pharma research for a Marijuana addiction drug. The research gets $3 million grant as Obama encourages legalization of Cannabis.

This is just too much! We do not need a "drug" to detoxify us from Cannabis! We need more Hemp and Cannabis Oil for Medical use,

Stop the funding effective immediately and give that $3 Million to a better cause.

Fact: GW Pharma has concluded that "Cannabis is not addictive" according to their ad for SATIVEX (which has not been approved for marketing in the U.S. as of yet — And SHOULD BE!). It additionally states that it does not appear to have withdrawal effects when stopped suddenly"…

Stop the INSANITY NOW! Stop the funding for an addiction drug for Cannabis!

Published Date: Jun 26, 2015

Issues: Civil Rights and Liberties, Disabilities, Health Care



Marijuana is medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association concludes

Posted on June 23, 2015 at 10:06 am by David Downs in featured, Health, Science


Marijuana is one hundred percent a form of medicine, researchers conclude in a bombshell series of reports released today by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Cannabis — which has been used medicinally for thousands of years — reduces nausea, and vomiting, and pain, as well as spasticity, a panel of researchers conclude, after reviewing a total of 79 trials.

“Use of marijuana for chronic pain, neuropathic pain, and spasticity due to multiple sclerosis is supported by high-quality evidence,” one of the reports found.

Researchers bemoaned the lack of high-quality trials of marijuana. That situation that can be laid at the feet of cannabis prohibition. The federal government maintains cannabis is a highly dangerous drug with no medical use. Researchers must cut through more red tape to research a pot plant than any other substance on the planet, doctors say.

However, this week, the federal government slightly reduced the regulatory hurdles to study cannabis — down from eight layers of review, to seven.

More than 750,000 Americans will be arrested for cannabis this year.

The Obama administration has spent an estimated $300 million interfering with state medical marijuana programs and patients, including arresting and prosecuting patients and caregivers. Thirty-five states have medical cannabis laws, and some members of Congress are working to de-fund federal attacks on medical marijuana.


Big pharma backs both sides in Pennsylvania marijuana debate

Written by Mark Walters, Evening Sun | Jun 22, 2015 1:15 PM



The Medical Cannabis Act, Senate Bill 3, was referred to the Health Committee last month. Introduced in January by Sen. Mike Folmer, R-Lebanon County, the bill cleared the Senate by a 40-7 vote last month.

(Harrisburg) — A Pennsylvania representative who has said he won’t bring a medical marijuana bill up for a vote has become a target of marijuana activists on social media who say his opposition is being purchased by pharmaceutical companies.

But state Rep. Matt Baker, R-Tioga County, who chairs the House Health Committee, said in an email that he has never spoken with a pharmaceutical company about marijuana.

The Medical Cannabis Act, Senate Bill 3, was referred to the Health Committee last month. Introduced in January by Sen. Mike Folmer, R-Lebanon County, the bill cleared the Senate by a 40-7 vote last month.

Baker’s campaign received $3,000 from political action committees for pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, Merck and AstraZeneca in 2014. In 2012, AstraZeneca gave Baker’s campaign $5,000. The same committees, however, paid collectively more money to state lawmakers who voted for S.B. 3, according to the committees’ online reports.

A Facebook group called "Rep Matt Baker Pennsylvania Traitor" had 943 likes as of June 18 and contains Internet memes that lambast the politician for receiving money from pharmaceutical companies and their political action committees.

"This page is about raising awareness about PA Rep Matt Baker, his ties to the pharmaceutical companies that pay for his campaigns, who he answers to," according to the group. One post by the group states that Baker received nearly $23,000 from one company in one year.

Questions surrounding his stance on medical marijuana being purchased are false accusations and a propaganda tactic of radical marijuana activists, Baker wrote in his email.

"I have always opposed legalizing marijuana as it is a federally-scheduled illegal drug as defined by federal law that has no medical value," said Baker, who has served in the House since 1993.

Friends of Rich Alloway, a campaign group for Sen. Rich Alloway, R-Chambersburg, received $1,500 from Merck in 2014, according to the committee’s website. Alloway voted in favor of S.B. 3.

"Candidates for public office receive contributions from political action committees and individuals for a variety of reasons," Alloway wrote in an email. "I believe that those who choose to donate to my campaign do so because they believe in me and the principles that I fight for in Harrisburg."

When a person or group finds themselves disagreeing with a legislator’s position, they look for justification, Alloway explained in his email. That search, he said, can result in accusing a donor of influencing the legislator’s decision, even though the legislator may simply disagree with a constituent on a particular issue.

Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery County, said he has never felt Baker was bought by the pharmaceutical industry. While he thinks it is misguided, Leach said he believes Baker’s opposition to medical marijuana is sincere.

Leach, who voted for S.B. 3, received $250 from Pfizer in 2014. The pharmaceutical company gave $1,000 to Baker last year, while also paying nearly $9,000 to senators who voted in favor of S.B. 3.

Contact Mark Walters at 717-771-2032.

Medical marijuana opponent receives threats at Capitol office

In addition to social media attacks, state Rep. Matt Baker, R-Tioga County, has also become the subject of threats as a result of his opposition to medical marijuana legislation in the committee he chairs.

One uniformed officer had to be present in Baker’s office at the Capitol’s Ryan Building on June 1 during a scheduled medical marijuana rally, said Troy Thompson, a spokesman for the state’s Department of General Services, which oversees the Capitol Police.

Capitol Police received a call from someone who works in Baker’s office, expressing safety concerns, said Thompson, who was not able to provide further details on the threat. A secretary at Baker’s Harrisburg office could not comment on the threat, deferring to Baker.

Baker said he receives daily phone calls and emails expressing animus and vitriol over his opposition to legalizing marijuana. Verbal and written threats are being closely examined as well as occasional efforts by some that he said could be viewed as harassment and stalking.

Public policy should have a respectful level of communication and civility, Baker said.

"Attempts to bully and intimidate anyone in public service that has ideological differences of opinion only creates a disservice to the bedrock principles of democracy, good government and the spirit of civility," Baker wrote in his email.

Contact Mark Walters at 717-771-2032.

About the political contributions

Pfizer’s political action committee paid $2.67 million to state and federal candidates nationwide from January 2013 to December 2014.

"We contribute to politicians on both sides of the aisle who deal with decisions important to our company, including innovation and access to medicines. We support government officials and candidates who work toward preserving and furthering innovation and expanding access to medicines; those are the two guiding principles for us in considering political donations."

— Sharon Castillo, media relations for Pfizer

Merck paid $103,250 to state and federal political campaigns in Pennsylvania in 2014, according to its political contributions report.

Merck is committed to participating constructively and responsibly in the political process, which includes providing support through the nonpartisan Merck political action committee (PAC). The PAC supports legislators from both major parties who understand and appreciate the work we do to discover and develop medicines and to make them available to the patients who need them.

— Lainie Keller, director of Merck’s global communications

Political contributions by candidates’ votes on Pennsylvania’s Medical Cannabis Act

Pfizer contributions to Senators from Jan. 2013 to Dec. 2014


Sen. Jacob Corman, R, $2,000

Sen. Jay Costa, D, $1,000

Sen. Andrew Dinniman, D, $1,850

Sen. Vincent Hughes, D, $1,000

Sen. Shirley Kitchen, D, $500

Sen. Daylin Leach, D, $250

Sen. Robert Mensch, R, $1,000

Sen. Dominic Pileggi, R, $2,000

Sen. John Rafferty, R $1,000

Sen. Joseph Scarnati, R, $2,000

Sen. Matthew Smith, D, $1,000

Sen. Kim Ward, R, $1,000

Sen. Donald White, R, $1,000

Sen. Rob Teplitz, D, $250


Sen. Patricia Vance, R, $1,000

Sen. Scott Hutchinson, R, $250

No vote

Sen. Stewart Greenleaf, R, $500

Pfizer gave $1,000 to Rep. Matt Baker in 2014

Merck contributions to pa Senators Jan. to Dec. 2014


Costa for State Senate $1,000

Friends of Andy Dinniman $1,500

Citizens for Hughes $1,650

Friends of Bob Mensch Committee $1,500

Friends of Chuck McIlhinney $1,000

Friends of Dominic Pileggi $5,000

Friends of Rich Alloway $1,500

Friends of Jake Corman $1,500

Friends of Don White $1,200

Friends of John Gordner $1,500

Rafferty for Senate $1,500

Tomlinson for State Senate $1,000


Elisabeth Baker for Senate $1,000

Voters to Elect Vance $2,500

No vote

Citizens for Browne $500

Citizens for Greenleaf $1,000

Merck gave Citizens to Elect Matt Baker $1,500 in 2014

AstraZeneca contributions to Senators for 2012


Friends of Chuck McIlhinney $2,000

Jay Costa Jr. for State Senate $2,000

Friends of Jake Corman $3,000

Friends of Joseph Scarnati $5,000

Friends of Dominic Pileggi $5,000


Voters to Elect Patricia Vance $3,000

AstraZeneca gave $3,000 to People to Elect Matt Baker in 2012


Medical marijuana: Treatment, oil could reduce kids’ epileptic seizures, but it remains illegal in Pa.

Medical marijuana bill clears Pa. Senate

Gov. Tom Wolf meets with parents who want medical marijuana legalized for their kids

Montel Williams lobbying for medical marijuana in Pennsylvania

This article comes to us through a partnership between the Evening Sun and WITF.


Man Serving 13 Years For Possessing Marijuana Two Joints Is Denied Clemency

Man Serving 13 Years For Possessing Marijuana Two Joints Is Denied Clemency

Posted by Johnny Green at 7:30 AM on June 22, 2015 Ending Marijuana Prohibition

marijuana cone joint

According to at least one reputable study, alcohol is 114 times more harmful than marijuana. Marijuana is also safer than tobacco and pharmaceuticals, both of which are legal. Knowing that, why does Louisiana have such harsh marijuana laws? A man is serving a 13 year sentence for possessing two marijuana joints in Louisiana. That’s right, a jail bed is being reserved for 13 years for a person who possessed two joints. There are pedophiles that serve less time than that, but sadly, that’s how the State of Louisiana treats marijuana.

One would think that a Governor would learn of this colossal waste of taxpayer dollars and would step up and grant clemency. However, Louisiana’s Governor Bobby Jindal had the opportunity to do just that, but refused to do so. Per Anthony Papa’s article on Alternet:

Bernard Noble, an individual serving 13 years for possessing two marijuana joints applied for clemency and was recently denied. The reason behind the denial was he had not yet served 10 years in prison. Bernard’s sentence is a prime example of the draconian nature of the marijuana laws in many states across the country. In stark contrast to Louisiana, many states have decriminalized possession of marijuana for personal use, with the offense being punishable by a fine and with no threat of jail time.

This is truly a case of injustice and the vehicle of clemency is totally appropriate here. But for some reason Gov. Jindal and his administration refuses to show compassion and follow the recent lead of President Obama who granted clemency to twenty two prisoners this March.

No one should serve even one minute in a jail cell for marijuana, let alone 13 years. How is this man such a danger to society that he needs to lose his freedom for so long? In Oregon, where I live, I’ll be able to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana starting next week. So why is Louisiana so far behind on the times? I don’t think I could ever live in Louisiana as a result of their ultra-harsh marijuana laws, or even visit for that matter, no matter how beautiful the state is.

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About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.


The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work.





The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work. The employee, Brandon Coats, was fired in 2010 when he failed a random drug test.

Needless to say, this was not a popular decision among marijuana legalization activists. In his appeal, Coats claimed that Colorado labor laws legitimized his use of marijuana, making his firing illegal under those same laws. The court’s ruling held that the term “lawful activity” must be considered in both a federal and a state legal context. Because marijuana use remains illegal under federal law and marijuana itself is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, the fact that both the Congress and the Obama administration’s Justice Department have signaled that enforcement will be both lightly funded and lightly enforced does not supersede the law. Under federal law, marijuana is a dangerous and illegal drug and that is the end of the story, regardless of the feds’ “wink-wink-nod-nod” approach.

At the Brookings Institution’s Fixgov blog, managing editor John Hudak noted:

Federal efforts have limited funding for the use of enforcing medical marijuana laws (Congress) or use prosecutorial discretion to limit the enforcement of marijuana laws (Department of Justice). However, those moves do not resolve the serious disconnects in the law that extend far beyond a medical marijuana patient fearing prosecution. Inconsistencies between state and federal marijuana laws extend to issues of employment, housing, banking, property rights, and a variety of other areas

We have noted before that the lack of a federal law — which only Congress can pass — raises any number of obstacles for companies in the marijuana industry. Dispensaries and growers cannot find bankers willing to take their cash deposits, and even a state government is having difficulty finding a willing bank. With almost half the states having approved the use of medical marijuana, perhaps it is time for Congress to fix a system that is truly broken.

ALSO READ: The 10 Largest Marijuana Companies

Read more: Congress Deserves Blame for Colorado Ruling Against Medical Marijuana – 24/7 Wall St.
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Man hid marijuana in ‘Mary Jane’ candy wrappers at airport: cops

By Philip Messing and Chris Perez

June 22, 2015 | 2:36pm


Embedded image permalink


This dope must of been high on his own supply.

A passenger at Newark Airport tried to sneak a stash of marijuana past the TSA — disguising it in Mary Jane candy wrappers, authorities said.

Gregory Murphy’s “bad trip” started Friday at around 5pm when he heard his name being paged over the loudspeakers as he prepared to board a plane at Gate 85, according to Port Authority police.

The 49-year-old Toms River, N.J. resident was confronted by TSA officers after they discovered Zig-Zag rolling papers and “a green leafy vegetation” inside of his checked luggage.

Murphy later admitted to Port Authority police that the greens — which was wrapped in seven Mary Jane candy wrappers and concealed in a plastic zip-lock baggie — was in fact marijuana and that it and the rolling papers belonged to him, authorities said.

Murphy was arrested and issued summonses for possession of marijuana under 50 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. He has been released and is due in court on July 7th.