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  • ShereeKrider 12:19 am on December 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Australia, california, , , Illinois, , Leafly, , Virginia,   

    Virginia’s Cannabis Arrest Rates Skyrocket: The Leafly Legalization Roundup 


    U.S. Cannabis Updates

    CALIFORNIA

    The Newport Beach City Council approved an ordinance banning dispensaries and delivery services in the area amid protests from the community. This ordinance prohibits the cultivation, processing, distribution, and delivery of medical marijuana in Newport Beach, and comes as a response to the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act, which was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on October 9th.

    Although the law will not go into effect until January 1st, 2016, one of the stipulations of the law is that local jurisdictions must take action now if they want to impose bans or moratoriums on medical marijuana; otherwise, the state will become the sole regulator for medical cannabis in the state of California.

    COLORADO

    A troubling report from CNN confirmed that high levels of banned pesticides have been turning up in medical and recreational marijuana products that are sold to the general public. Various samples tested positive for a neurotoxin known as imidacloprid, which was banned for use on marijuana crops. Even brief exposure to the chemical can have serious side effects, such as irritation, dizziness, breathlessness, confusion, and vomiting. The tests found that products contained more than 100 times the legal amount and resulted in 2,362 products being pulled from the shelves, having been deemed unfit for public consumption.

    The report comes directly after an executive order from Governor John Hickenlooper was issued urging local agencies to destroy products that contain high levels of pesticides and contaminants.

    ILLINOIS

    Cultivators in Southern Illinois, Murphysboro, and Anna have been given the green light to begin cultivating strains for Illinois’ medical cannabis program. Two companies, Ieso and Wellness Group Pharms, have begun the process of cultivation, although it will be several months before any product will hit dispensary shelves. Ieso will be using a 23,000 square-foot greenhouse at the cultivation center in Southern Illinois Airport, and Wellness Group Pharms has a 27,000 square-foot facility in Anna that has started production.

    Tom Jennings, co-manager of Ieso, said that they’re starting with a staff of 14, hiring for another six positions, and will likely expand in the future (check out Ieso’s careers page if you’re interested in applying for an open position). Paul Montes, managing partner of Wellness Group Pharms, said that they have a team of eight and will be hiring more employees as they grow their team and security for the facility. If you’d like to join the Wellness Group "Phamily," you can download their job application.

    VIRGINIA

    In the ultra-conservative state of Virginia, a report released by the Drug Policy Alliance highlights a disconcerting pattern that has emerged in the state’s arrest records for marijuana. Despite a nationwide drop of 6.5 percent in arrests for marijuana possession between 2003 and 2014, arrests in Virginia for marijuana possession skyrocketed by 76 percent during the same time period. Not only that, but there was a clear racial disparity in marijuana arrests – the state saw an increase of 106 percent in arrests of black people between 2003 and 2014, accounting for 47 percent of Virginia’s arrests even though its population is only 20 percent black.

    In the meantime, just across the river in Washington, D.C., as of November 6th, the District’s marijuana arrests dropped a whopping 99.2 percent. In an area once rife with arrests for marijuana possession (and once home to a clear racial disparity in arrests as well), so far this year there have been a total of exactly seven people arrested for marijuana in D.C.

    WISCONSIN

    A bill is under consideration by the Wisconsin legislature that would legalize the medicinal use of cannabidiol oil for those with severe seizure disorders who qualify. Senate Bill 221 would amend the Wisconsin Constitution to distinguish between cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), so as to allow physicians to recommend the use of the oil to be dispensed by an approved pharmacy or doctor.

    Families with children who suffer from seizure disorders tearfully petitioned legislators to pass the bill at a hearing for the bill last week, but unfortunately the Wisconsin Medical Society has already come out against the legislation, citing a lack of research.

    International Cannabis Updates

    AUSTRALIA

    A cannabis crop bigger than the Sydney Football Stadium was discovered on a secluded walking trail in New South Wales at the Bundjalung National Park. More than 8,500 plants, worth an estimated $6.2 million, were surreptitiously planted in a patch of juvenile plants surrounded by a fence 150 meters by 50 meters (164 yards by 54.6 yards). The entire crop was seized by the NSW’s Cannabis Eradication Program and incinerated in a massive bonfire, the likes of which we can only imagine.

    ISRAEL

    A recent poll showed that the vast majority of Israeli college students believe that Israeli drug policy should differentiate between cannabis and much harder drugs like heroin and cocaine. The National Union of Israeli Students found that 89 percent of students would like to see a change in drug policy to reflect the difference between the types of drugs. Additionally, 43 percent said that cannabis should be legalized and sold under government regulation, while 2 percent favored a free-for-all system in which anyone could buy or sell drugs. The percentage of respondents who favored total prohibition on cannabis also dropped from 14 percent last year to 11 percent in 2015.

    Catch up on last week’s roundup, or check out our other legalization news articles!

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:59 pm on April 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: california, Compassionate and Sensible Access Act, , , Sacramento   

    California: “COMPASSIONATE AND SENSIBLE ACCESS ACT” 


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    CALIFORNIA PATIENTS FILE THE “COMPASSIONATE AND SENSIBLE ACCESS ACT”AS A STATEWIDE CONSTITUTIONAL INITIATIVE

    Sacramento, California

    Washington State and Colorado have failed to provide protection for people who use cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    Corporate greed has brought new players into the legalization movement. These people seek to corner the marijuana distribution market by eliminating competition and access to increase their profit.

    These people seek to continue the high profits of Prohibition by the continued criminalization and attacks against people who choose to use cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    This initiative will protect patients and their doctors. Members and leaders of The California Cannabis Coalition, Yuba County ASA, Orange County Norml, Crusaders for Patient’s Rights along with several statewide activists are sponsoring.

    TEXT

    INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT TO BE SUBMITTED DIRECTLY TO THE VOTERS

    Title: The Compassionate and Sensible Access Act

    Findings and Declarations

    The People of the State of California, through the passage of the Compassionate Use Act, recognize that cannabis in all forms, including but not limited to its flowers, leaves, and derivatives and concentrates thereof, is an alternative medicinal treatment.

    Since the passage of the Compassionate Use Act, more and more evidence supports the People’s conclusion that cannabis is a valuable medicinal herb.

    Despite this evidence and the People’s desire to make access to cannabis safe and affordable to anyone it may help, many local jurisdictions have sought to pass regulations and restrictions effectively denying such safe and affordable access.

    Therefore, We the People propose this Compassionate and Sensible Access Act be added to the Constitution of the State of California:

    Cannabis is a legitimate, alternative medicinal treatment. Therefore:

    (1) No state or local agency or body shall adopt a law that burdens in any way the ability of doctors to recommend cannabis for medicinal and/or therapeutic purposes, unless said law applies such burden equally to the recommendation of other herbal or therapeutic treatments.

    (2) No state or local agency or body shall pass any law which impedes a patient’s ability to obtain or cultivate cannabis in any manner that is consistent with the other flora cultivation and business in said jurisdiction.

    (3) No state or local agency or body shall enact any legislation that impedes a patient’s ability to obtain, transport or cultivate cannabis, so long as the method of obtaining, cultivating or transporting cannabis is consistent with the business practices and/or cultivation practices of other flora in said jurisdiction.

    (4) No state or local agency or body shall adopt laws that create non-competitive marketplaces for medical cannabis and its derivatives.

    Definitions

    For the purposes of this act, cannabis is defined as (a) a genus of flowering plants that includes three different species, Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica and Cannabis ruderalis, (b) any member of such genus, and (c) any part or any derivative of such plant or plants.

    This section shall be interpreted liberally to effect the purposes set forth herein.

    http://www.californiacannabiscoalition.org

     
  • ShereeKrider 5:59 pm on April 1, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: california, Cheney Loophole, , Halliburton Loophole, , maryland, new york, U.S. government   

    What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned? 


     

    https://i0.wp.com/www.foodandwaterwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FrackingWastePit_BGS_WEB.jpg

     

    The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

    But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

    Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

    Ban Fracking in Your Area

    No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

    Learn More

     

     
  • ShereeKrider 4:41 pm on December 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: california, , , seizures   

    Miracle marijuana? 6-year-old California boy’s violent seizures dramatically subside with help of liquid marijuana 


    Child’s father said seizures were a daily nightmare before the medical marijuana treatment. But medical experts question risks of treating children with the drug.

    Comments (10)

    By Victoria Cavaliere / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 8:57 AM

    Jayden David’s seizures have been reduced, and his life is far more normal, now that he’s medicated with a form of liquid marijuana, his father Jason said.

     

    A six-year-old California boy who suffers severe seizures that leave him shaking on the ground and crying for help has finally found some relief, his family says.

    Jayden David now takes a dose of medical marijuana.

    "He’s in pain and suffering and crying," father Jason David said. "You can’t help him no matter what. What are you supposed to do? You have to do whatever it takes to save their life."

    Jayden’s seizures were an almost daily nightmare, David told CNN. His son’s life was so crippled by the violent shaking caused by Dravet’s syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy, he couldn’t walk or eat solid food and he had been rushed to the hospital in their hometown of Oakland more than 40 times.

    Jayden was even taking 22 pills a day, though nothing improved his condition.

    So last year, David gave his son a liquid form of marijuana, which is legal for some medical purposes in California. The results were dramatic, David said.

    For the first time since he was four-months-old, Jayden can now make it through a day without a seizure, his father said.

    In the past year he has been able to walk, run, swim and play with other children.

    His father has also begun to take Jayden off the two dozen anti-seizure pills he had been prescribed, believing they might have kept the boy from developing properly, CNN reported.

    Harborside Health Center, a medical marijuana clinic in Oakland, California, said Jayden isn’t the only child patient they help.

    Children with severe autism, epilepsy, ADHD and cancer can be helped by medicinal marijuana, executive director Steven DeAngelo said.

    PLEASE CONTINUE READING AT LINK BELOW AND VIEW VIDEO….

    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/boy-6-takes-medical-marijuana-seizures-article-1.1217519#ixzz2ElJZytRX

     
  • ShereeKrider 2:10 am on October 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: california, , , , lawsuit, , oakland,   

    Law Blog Fireside: The Lawyer Protecting Oakland’s Medical Pot 


    By Joe Palazzolo
    iStock

    Oakland, Calif., is trying to keep the federal government from seizing its biggest medical-marijuana dispensary.

    On Wednesday, the city took a bold step: It sued the feds, arguing that the U.S. attorney for Northern California is barred from seizing the property by the five-year statute of limitations on civil forfeiture.

    Sure, it’s illegal to sell medical marijuana under federal law, but President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have said publicly they wouldn’t pursue people who are in compliance with state law. A 2009 Justice Department memo gave the same guidance to U.S. attorneys.

    California, of course, permits the sale of medical marijuana, and Oakland strictly regulates and taxes its dispensaries. Harborside Health Center, the property at issue here, has been open since 2006 and sells more than $20 million of pot annually, according to its owner.

    The lawsuit argues that the Justice Department can’t snatch up Harborside Health Center, because of the doctrine of estoppel, which says, in essence, you can’t say one thing and do another. U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag has said Harborside has grown into a large-scale operation that isn’t legal even under California law.

    Law Blog caught up with Cedric Chao, who is representing Oakland. When he’s not suing the federal government, Mr. Chao is co-chairman of Morrison & Foerster LLP’s international litigation and arbitration practice.

    Law Blog: So this is the first case of its type?

    Cedric Chao: We’re not aware of a city pushing back on a forfeiture action against a medical cannabis dispensary.

    LB: We noticed you refer to medical marijuana as “cannabis” throughout the lawsuit. Any reason?

    CC: No, but people refer to it both ways.

    LB: You argue that DOJ can’t go after Harborside because it opened six years ago — exceeding the five-year statute of limitations. Isn’t there a good argument that, since Harborside continued to break federal law until this year, the clock shouldn’t start ticking until after the dispensary stopped selling medical cannabis?

    CC: Well there’s actually a case out there in the Sixth Circuit that addresses this issue. In the context of a gambling operation, it held that the statute of limitations began on the first discovery of illegal conduct by the government and that the government was not allowed to claim that the statute of limitations was reset every single day.

    LB: I guess the government can’t credibly argue it wasn’t aware of the Oakland dispensaries until now.

    CC: They had websites, they had advertisements, they wanted the patient population to know they had safe access to medical cannabis.

    LB: But the fact remains. Medical marijuana is illegal under federal law. How do you convince a federal judge that just because the attorney general tells his troops not to go after certain individuals that means it’s OK to break federal law?

    CC: Seventeen states plus the District of Columbia have agreed that it is lawful to sell cannabis for medical purposes, so, clearly, there’s a division of thought. And clearly the top officials of our government also believed there were medical benefits to cannabis, otherwise they would not have said publicity that DOJ’s resources will not be used to prosecute where patients, caregivers and dispensaries are acting in conformity with state law. They well knew that people were hanging on their every word. So how is it, after their words and actions and people acting in reliance on those, can they reverse course and say, “Never mind?”

    LB: So you’re doing this case pro bono?

    CC: Yes.

    LB: It’s a controversial issue. Do you worry about getting pegged as the cannabis lawyer?

    CC: As a lawyer, you take an oath and you have a client and you do the best for your client. This issue has important public ramifications, and if I didn’t think it was important, I wouldn’t take it.

    LB: Thanks, Cedric.

    CONTINUE READING…

     
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