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  • ShereeKrider 1:07 pm on July 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , descheduling, , legislature, , Medical Maijuana   

    Is pot as dangerous as heroin? Feds’ decision on rescheduling marijuana coming soon 


    El Monte Police Lt. Christopher Williams looks over a portion of about 500 marijuana plants in various stages of growth after serving a search warrant at a home at 4300-block of Huddart Avenue in El Monte on Monday March 9, 2015.

     

    By Brooke Edwards Staggs, The Orange County Register

    Posted: 07/09/16, 8:37 PM PDT

     

    At the same time Californians are preparing to vote on the legalization of adult marijuana use, the federal government is weighing whether pot should continue to be classified as a top-tier narcotic on par with heroin.

    Within a month, the Drug Enforcement Administration is expected to release a much-anticipated decision that could alter cannabis’ ranking in the hierarchy of controlled substances — a formal listing that affects everything from medical research to taxing policy.

    Since the list was created in 1970, marijuana has been ranked in Schedule I — the most restrictive category ­alongside heroin, LSD and peyote. The designation is reserved for drugs the DEA says have no proven medical use and are highly addictive.

    What about Congress?

    Even if the Drug Enforcement and Food And Drug administrations don’t recommend changing where marijuana falls on the controlled substances list, Congress could.

    Elected officials are more likely to be influenced by growing public acceptance of marijuana — particularly if they represent one of 25 states with legal marijuana programs.

    “I think that’s probably an easier sell than the decision coming from doctors and police,” said John Hudak, a deputy director with the Brookings Institution.

    Some members of Congress support rescheduling marijuana, including Sen. Barbara Boxer. Some have even pitched descheduling it, including presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders. But none of those efforts gained traction, and Paul Armentano with the advocacy group NORML isn’t optimistic Congress will act on the issue anytime soon.

    “I’m not aware of a single hearing much less a vote even in a subcommittee that has ever taken place at the Congressional level specific to the notion of reclassifying marijuana,” he said.

    “We’re bound by the science,” said Melvin Patterson, spokesman for the DEA.

    But many experts and advocates say the current classification is increasingly at odds with scientific studies on marijuana, which suggest the drug has medical value in treating chronic pain, seizures and a number of other conditions, with a lower addiction rate than alcohol.

    The DEA ranking also lags behind a growing public consensus. Roughly 80 percent of Americans believe medical marijuana should be legal, according to recent polls, while some 60 percent support legalizing the drug for all adults.

    “In 2016, this notion that cannabis possesses potential harms equal to that of heroin … simply doesn’t pass the smell test,” said Paul Armentano, deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML.

    Medical marijuana is now legal in 25 states. Recreational use is allowed in four states plus Washington, D.C. If California green-lights recreational use this November, one in six Americans would live in a state where adults would be allowed to freely use cannabis.

    The question of how cannabis should be ranked has been hotly debated since Congress placed it in the Schedule I group when it passed the Controlled Substances Act nearly 46 years ago. The drug’s classification has been reviewed periodically, with the latest reexamination prompted by a petition filed with the DEA five years ago by the then-governors of Rhode Island and Washington.

    In April, the DEA advised Congress that it expected to announce a decision in the first half of 2016.

    Patterson said officials now “clearly anticipate something happening in the next month.”

    The agency has several options: keep cannabis as a Schedule I drug; reclassify some or all of its compounds to a lower schedule; or remove the plant from the controlled substances list altogether.

    There is a greater chance than ever that marijuana will be rescheduled, said John Hudak, who studies the topic as a deputy director with the Brookings Institution. But he still expects pot to remain a Schedule I drug.

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    “It needs to cross a threshold that says it has an accepted medical value,” Hudak said. “While there are plenty of patients and doctors who do believe it has medical value, that’s not a universal belief in the medical community.”

    Leslie Bocskor, president of Las Vegas-based cannabis advisory firm Electrum Partners, thinks the odds slightly favor a reclassification of marijuana to Schedule II. That category includes morphine and cocaine, which the DEA says are highly addictive but have some medical value. A form of cocaine, for example, is used by some dentists as a local anesthetic.

    The least restrictive of the five schedule categories, Schedule V, includes cough syrup with a bit of codeine.

    Alcohol and tobacco aren’t included on the DEA’s controlled substances list, even though federal studies have found both are associated with higher dependency rates than marijuana.

    Patterson said the DEA frequently hears from people frustrated that marijuana hasn’t been rescheduled sooner.

    “They have their mind made up on what marijuana does in the short term,” he said. “But what about different strains? What about 10 years from now or even 20 years from now? Long-term effects matter.”

    For the medical marijuana community, even reclassifying cannabis as a Schedule II drug would offer some vindication.

    “At a minimum, it would bring an end to the federal government’s longstanding intellectual dishonesty that marijuana ‘lacks accepted medical use,’ ” Armentano said.

    Such a shift by the DEA also might offer a small boost to at least half-a-dozen states with medical or recreational marijuana initiatives on the ballot this November.

    That potential to give some credence to legalization efforts is one of the reasons a few members of Congress, including Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, and the organization Smart Approaches to Marijuana, or SAM, cite in arguing against reclassifying marijuana.

    “Rescheduling would simply be a symbolic victory for advocates who want to legalize marijuana,” SAM wrote in a policy paper on the issue.

    But both the California and American medical associations say rescheduling pot could lower the barriers a bit for federally sanctioned drug research.

    The DEA has never turned down a marijuana research request that met federal criteria, Patterson said. But experts say red tape related to Schedule I drug research is so formidable that it discourages applications. So while there are tens of thousands of peer-reviewed studies on marijuana, there are few costly and rigorous double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving cannabis.

    Moreover, researchers say, marijuana studies are saddled with restrictions that don’t apply to other Schedule I drugs.

    Since 1968, for example, the federal government has said only a tightly controlled stock of high-quality marijuana grown under contract by the University of Mississippi can be used for FDA-approved studies. Armentano said that restricts the supply available for research.

    If marijuana were reclassified to at least Schedule III — alongside Tylenol with codeine and anabolic steroids — it would mean the nation’s rapidly growing number of cannabis-related businesses could begin deducting operating expenses from their federal taxes.

    Under a tax rule imposed during the Reagan Administration’s 1980s anti-drug war, businesses dealing in Schedule I or II substances are prohibited from writing off common expenses such as rent, utilities or advertising.

    Harborside Health Center, a large Oakland dispensary, has been battling the IRS over the rule for five years, after being assessed $2.4 million for illegal deductions. A decision in that case is expected soon.

    Even if cannabis was moved down the controlled substances list to the least-restrictive category, the industry would still be likely to face business and regulatory hurdles.

    Armentano likened such a change, should it come, to the first stride in a marathon.

    “Technically, it gets you closer to the finish line,” he said. “But you still have a whole hell of a long way to go.”

    Pot would remain an illegal substance under federal law. Reclassification wouldn’t necessarily open access to banking services, Hudak said. And doctors wouldn’t automatically switch to writing prescriptions, as opposed to “recommendations,” for medical marijuana, since that’s only allowed for FDA-approved drugs.

    “There are certain people who play up rescheduling as an earth-shattering reform,” Hudak said. “It is not.”

    He said sweeping changes would only come in the unlikely event that cannabis was completely descheduled, putting it on par with alcohol.

    That would allow local governments to create cannabis policies free from federal interference, Armentano said, the way they can set their own hours for when bars stop serving alcohol or make entire counties “dry.”

    Armentano isn’t optimistic the DEA will move marijuana to a less restrictive category, but he said there’s been one positive result from the current review.

    “There’s attention being paid to how they handle this situation in a way that just wasn’t there before,” he said. “If the DEA goes down the same path as it has in the past, I think they’re going to have some explaining to do.”

    CONTINUE READING…

     
  • ShereeKrider 6:38 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , General Assembly, , , , legislature, , misdeameanor, violations   

    Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to pre-payable violations and set fines. 


     

     

    HB 305/CI (BR 395) – B. Yonts

         AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.
         Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to prepayable violations and set fines.

         Feb 5-introduced in House

    Legislature Home Page | Record Front Page

     

    Thru the DIRECT LINK above can be found the newest version of the Kentucky “decrim” bill.

    The following text has been copied from that record:

     

    AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.

    Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky:

    âSection 1. KRS 218A.1422 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of possession of marijuana when he or she knowingly and unlawfully possesses marijuana.

    (2) Any person who violates this section shall be fined one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[Possession of marijuana is a Class B misdemeanor, except that, KRS Chapter 532 to the contrary notwithstanding, the maximum term of incarceration shall be no greater than forty-five (45) days].

    âSection 2. KRS 218A.210 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person to whom or for whose use any controlled substance has been prescribed, sold, or dispensed, by a practitioner or other person authorized under this chapter, may lawfully possess it only in the container in which it was delivered to him by the person selling or dispensing the same.

    (2) Any person who violates this section shall be fined two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[Violation of subsection (1) of this section is a Class B misdemeanor for the first offense and a Class A misdemeanor for subsequent offenses].

    âSection 3. KRS 218A.500 is amended to read as follows:

    As used in this section and KRS 218A.510:

    (1) "Drug paraphernalia" means all equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter. It includes but is not limited to:

    (a) Kits used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, or harvesting of any species of plant which is a controlled substance or from which a controlled substance can be derived;
    (b) Kits used, intended for use, or designed for use in manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, or preparing controlled substances;
    (c) Isomerization devices used, intended for use, or designed for use in increasing the potency of any species of plant which is a controlled substance;
    (d) Testing equipment used, intended for use, or designed for use in identifying, or in analyzing the strength, effectiveness or purity of controlled substances;
    (e) Scales and balances used, intended for use, or designed for use in weighing or measuring controlled substances;
    (f) Diluents and adulterants, such as quinine hydrochloride, mannitol, mannite, dextrose and lactose, used, intended for use, or designed for use in cutting controlled substances;
    (g) Separation gins and sifters used, intended for use, or designed for use in removing twigs and seeds from, or in otherwise cleaning or refining marijuana;
    (h) Blenders, bowls, containers, spoons, and mixing devices used, intended for use, or designed for use in compounding controlled substances;
    (i) Capsules, balloons, envelopes, and other containers used, intended for use, or designed for use in packaging small quantities of controlled substances;
    (j) Containers and other objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in storing or concealing controlled substances;
    (k) Hypodermic syringes, needles, and other objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in parenterally injecting controlled substances into the human body; and
    (l) Objects used, intended for use, or designed for use in ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish, or hashish oil into the human body, such as: metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes with or without screens, permanent screens, hashish heads, or punctured metal bowls; water pipes; carburetion tubes and devices; smoking and carburetion masks; roach clips which mean objects used to hold burning material, such as marijuana cigarettes, that have become too small or too short to be held in the hand; miniature cocaine spoons, and cocaine vials; chamber pipes; carburetor pipes; electric pipes; air-driven pipes; chillums; bongs; ice pipes or chillers.

    (2) It is unlawful for any person to use, or to possess with intent to use, drug paraphernalia for the purpose of planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packing, repacking, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter.

    (3) It is unlawful for any person to deliver, possess with intent to deliver, or manufacture with intent to deliver, drug paraphernalia, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that it will be used to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, inject, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this chapter.

    (4) It is unlawful for any person to place in any newspaper, magazine, handbill, or other publication any advertisement, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that the purpose of the advertisement, in whole or in part, is to promote the sale of objects designed or intended for use as drug paraphernalia.

    (5) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[guilty of a Class A misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 4. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 218A IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 5. KRS 434.851 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful access in the third degree when he or she, without the effective consent of the owner, knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly accesses, causes to be accessed, or attempts to access any computer software, computer program, data, computer, computer system, computer network, or any part thereof, which results in the loss or damage of less than three hundred dollars ($300).

    (2) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for each offense[Unlawful access to a computer in the third degree is a Class A misdemeanor].

    âSection 6. KRS 434.853 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful access in the fourth degree when he or she, without the effective consent of the owner, knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly accesses, causes to be accessed, or attempts to access any computer software, computer program, data, computer, computer system, computer network, or any part thereof, which does not result in loss or damage.

    (2) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be fined one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[Unlawful access to a computer in the fourth degree is a Class B misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 7. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 434 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 8. KRS 511.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the second degree when he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in a building or upon premises as to which notice against trespass is given by fencing or other enclosure.

    (2) Criminal trespass in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 9. KRS 511.080 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the third degree when he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in or upon premises.

    (2) Criminal trespass in the third degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of fifty dollars ($50) for each offense.

    âSECTION 10. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 511 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 11. KRS 512.060 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal possession of a noxious substance when he possesses such substance under circumstances evincing an intent unlawfully to use or cause it to be used to inflict injury upon or to cause annoyance to a person, or to damage property of another, or to disturb the public peace.

    (2) Criminal possession of a noxious substance is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 12. KRS 512.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of criminal littering when he:

    (a) Drops or permits to drop on a highway any destructive or injurious material and does not immediately remove it; or
    (b) Knowingly places or throws litter on any public or private property or in any public or private water without permission; or
    (c) Negligently places or throws glass or other dangerous pointed or edged substances on or adjacent to water to which the public has access for swimming or wading or on or within fifty (50) feet of a public highway; or
    (d) Discharges sewage, minerals, oil products, or litter into any public waters or lakes within the state.

    (2) Criminal littering is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    (3) Violators may prepay to the Circuit Court clerk if prepayment is so noted on the citation and if the littering offense is not combined with an offense that is not prepayable.

    (4) Notwithstanding any language or provision of this section or KRS 65.8808(3) to the contrary, the legislative body of a local government may, by ordinance, choose to classify the offenses proscribed in subsection (1) of this section as civil offenses in accordance with KRS 65.8808.

    âSECTION 13. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 512 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 14. KRS 516.130 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawfully using slugs in the second degree when:

    (a) With intent to defraud the owner, licensee or lessee of a coin machine, he inserts, deposits or uses a slug in such machine; or
    (b) He makes, possesses or disposes of a slug with intent to enable a person to insert, deposit or use it in a coin machine.

    (2) Unlawfully using slugs in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    The offense shall be prepayable except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 15. KRS 517.030 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of false advertising when, in connection with the promotion of the sale of or to increase the consumption of property or services, he knowingly makes or causes to be made a false or misleading statement in any advertisement addressed to the public or to a substantial number of persons.

    (2) False advertising is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    âSection 16. KRS 517.040 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of bait advertising when in any manner, including advertising or other means of communication, he offers to the public or a substantial number of persons property or services as part of a scheme or plan with the intent not to sell or provide the advertised property or services:

    (a) At the price at which he offered them; or
    (b) In a quantity sufficient to meet the reasonably expected public demand, unless the quantity is specifically stated in the advertisement; or
    (c) At all.

    (2) Bait advertising is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 17. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 517 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 18. KRS 519.030 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of compounding a crime when:

    (a) He solicits, accepts or agrees to accept any benefit upon an agreement or understanding that he will refrain from initiating a prosecution for a crime; or
    (b) He confers, offers, or agrees to confer any benefit upon another person upon agreement or understanding that such other person will refrain from initiating a prosecution for a crime.

    (2) In any prosecution under this section, it is a defense that the benefit did not exceed an amount which the defendant reasonably believed to be due as restitution or indemnification for harm caused by the offense.

    (3) Compounding a crime is a violation and shall carry a fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense[ Class A misdemeanor]. The offense shall be prepayable except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 19. KRS 525.050 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful assembly when:

    (a) He assembles with five (5) or more persons for the purpose of engaging or preparing to engage with them in a riot; or
    (b) Being present at an assembly which either has or develops such a purpose, he remains there with intent to advance that purpose.

    (2) Unlawful assembly is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 20. KRS 525.080 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of harassing communications when, with intent to intimidate, harass, annoy, or alarm another person, he or she:

    (a) Communicates with a person, anonymously or otherwise, by telephone, telegraph, mail, or any other form of written communication in a manner which causes annoyance or alarm and serves no purpose of legitimate communication;
    (b) Makes a telephone call, whether or not conversation ensues, with no purpose of legitimate communication; or
    (c) Communicates, while enrolled as a student in a local school district, with or about another school student, anonymously or otherwise, by telephone, the Internet, telegraph, mail, or any other form of electronic or written communication in a manner which a reasonable person under the circumstances should know would cause the other student to suffer fear of physical harm, intimidation, humiliation, or embarrassment and which serves no purpose of legitimate communication.

    (2) Harassing communications is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 21. KRS 525.060 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of disorderly conduct in the second degree when in a public place and with intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, or wantonly creating a risk thereof, he:

    (a) Engages in fighting or in violent, tumultuous, or threatening behavior;
    (b) Makes unreasonable noise;
    (c) Refuses to obey an official order to disperse issued to maintain public safety in dangerous proximity to a fire, hazard, or other emergency; or
    (d) Creates a hazardous or physically offensive condition by any act that serves no legitimate purpose.

    (2) Disorderly conduct in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 22. KRS 525.100 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of public intoxication when he appears in a public place manifestly under the influence of a controlled substance, or other intoxicating substance, excluding alcohol (unless the alcohol is present in combination with any of the above), not therapeutically administered, to the degree that he may endanger himself or other persons or property, or unreasonably annoy persons in his vicinity.

    (2) Public intoxication is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSection 23. KRS 525.150 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of disrupting meetings and processions in the second degree when, with intent to prevent or disrupt a lawful meeting, procession, or gathering, he or she does any act tending to obstruct or interfere with it physically or makes any utterance, gesture, or display designed to outrage the sensibilities of the group.

    (2) Disrupting meetings and processions in the second degree is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense[ Class B misdemeanor].

    âSECTION 24. A NEW SECTION OF KRS CHAPTER 525 IS CREATED TO READ AS FOLLOWS:

    (1) All offenses classified as violations under this chapter shall be prepayable except:

    (a) Any offense which could result in license suspension or revocation by the court;
    (b) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (c) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (d) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    (2) If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

    âSection 25. KRS 530.070 is amended to read as follows:

    (1) A person is guilty of unlawful transaction with a minor in the third degree when:

    (a) Acting other than as a retail licensee, he knowingly sells, gives, purchases or procures any alcoholic or malt beverage in any form to or for a minor. The defendant may prove in exculpation that the sale was induced by the use of false, fraudulent, or altered identification papers or other documents and that the appearance and character of the purchaser were such that his age could not have been ascertained by any other means and that the purchaser’s appearance and character indicated strongly that he was of legal age to purchase alcoholic beverages. This subsection does not apply to a parent or guardian of the minor;
    (b) He knowingly induces, assists, or causes a minor to engage in any other criminal activity;
    (c) He knowingly induces, assists or causes a minor to become a habitual truant; or
    (d) He persistently and knowingly induces, assists or causes a minor to disobey his parent or guardian.

    (2) Unlawful transaction with a minor in the third degree, other than a violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section, is a Class A misdemeanor. A violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section is a violation and shall carry a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for each offense. A violation of subsection (1)(c) of this section shall be prepayable, except:

    (a) An offense where evidence of the offense or of commission of another offense is seized by the officer and the citation is so marked and a court date set;
    (b) If the offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable; or
    (c) If an arrest is made under KRS 431.015.

    If a prepayable offense is cited with another offense that is not prepayable, a court appearance shall be required on all of the offenses as required by KRS 431.452.

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:30 am on March 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , legislature, , , , perry clark, ,   

    Mitch McConnell’s Marijuana Comments Prove He’s A Reefer Madness Fool 


    Mitch McConnell Thinks Marijuana Causes Death
    I just read a media report that exemplifies the stupidity that permeates the halls of Washington D.C

    .  The Huffington Post has a story out today talking about how Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky) told a constituent via letter that he doesn’t support the idea of marijuana legalization because marijuana can lead to death.

    There was a copy of the Mitch McConnell letter posted to grasscity.com by the constituent, which stated, “Hi Blades, got a letter back from Mitch McConnell about legalizing marijuana. I’ll let the letter speak for itself. WOWZA.”  Below is the letter:

    mitch mcconnell anti-mariuana letter

    What an idiot right?  Did Mitch McConnell actually think that this was a sufficient answer?  When are we going to see a reefer madness politician admit the truth – they make more money opposing marijuana legalization than they do supporting it, so they will never support marijuana legalization as long as that’s the case.  While I think that’s almost as ridiculous as the response Mitch McConnell gave, it would be a breathe of fresh air compared to the constantly BS that they always say.

    Let’s analyze what Mitch McConnell wrote.  The second paragraph states, “I have serious concerns about proposals to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes.  First, synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary ingredient in marijuana, is currently available in pill for for the treatment of HIV wasting syndrome and other illnesses.”

    You cant fix stupid

    Politicians who are too lazy to educate themselves on the deficiencies of Marinol should be banned from talking about it, because it is a danger to society.  What if people actually believed Marinol was the end all of medical marijuana, and relied solely on it to provide the benefits that raw cannabis provides?  They would be putting themselves in harms way, as Marinol is not the same thing as real marijuana.  Below is stellar information that proves why Marinol is not as good as real marijuana:

    Introduction

    Marinol1 (dronabinol) is the only US FDA-approved synthetic cannabinoid. It is often marketed as a legal pharmaceutical alternative to natural cannabis.

    Marinol is manufactured as a gelatin capsule containing synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in sesame oil. It is taken orally and is available in 2.5mg, 5mg and/or 10mg dosages. Marinol may be prescribed for the treatment of cachexia (weight loss) in patients with AIDS and for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conventional antiemetic treatments.

    Despite FDA approval2, Marinol typically provides only limited relief to select patients, particularly when compared to natural cannabis and its cannabinoids. Marinol should remain a legal option for patients and physicians; however, federal and state laws should be amended to allow for those patients who are unresponsive to synthetic THC the ability to use natural cannabis and its cannabinoids as a medical therapy without fear of arrest and/or criminal prosecution. By prohibiting the possession and use of natural cannabis and its cannabinoids, patients are unnecessarily restricted to use a synthetic substitute that lacks much of the therapeutic efficacy of natural cannabis.

    Marinol Lacks Several of the Therapeutic Compounds Available in Natural Cannabis

    CONTINUE READING…

     
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