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  • ShereeKrider 11:41 pm on August 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , LMPD, Louisville Metro Council, Louisville Metro Police Department, , state   

    “We are asking the Council to adopt a Lowest Law Enforcement Priority for cannabis possession in Jefferson County” 


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    RE: LOUISVILLE METRO COUNCIL AND MARIJUANA                 ENFORCEMENT.

    Dan Seum

    3 hrs ·

    We will be addressing Metro Council this evening at 6:00.

     We are asking the Council to adopt a Lowest Law Enforcement Priority for cannabis possession in Jefferson County.

    No more arrests Or citations for simple cannabis possession!

    We have support in the council and we need the support of those who are skeptical….Please attend this meeting, and subsequent meetings, to show support for the Ordinance…Below is the written speech that I will use to plea for the ordinance…

    Let’s Fill the room!

    My name is Dan Seum, Jr.

    I represent the majority of Kentucky and Jefferson County Citizens who believe cannabis should be legalized for medicinal and responsible adult use.

    Polls throughout Kentucky have proven that the majority of our voting public support cannabis legalization. A most recent poll conducted by WHAS in Jefferson County reported over 85% approve of legalization to help with Kentucky’s pension crisis.

    The enforcement of marijuana possession laws needlessly ensnares thousands of our otherwise law-abiding citizens into the criminal justice system and wastes millions of Kentucky taxpayers’ dollars that could be better invested in our communities. What’s more, it is carried out with staggering racial bias. Despite being a priority for police departments nationwide, the War on Marijuana has failed to reduce marijuana use and availability. In any given year Kentucky ranks #1,2, or 3 in marijuana production as well as exports.

    All wars are expensive, and the War on Marijuana has been no different. Not only has our state and local governments blown millions that could have been otherwise invested, the personal cost to those arrested is often significant and can linger for years. When people are arrested for possessing even tiny amounts of marijuana, it can have dire collateral consequences that affect their eligibility for public housing and student financial aid, employment opportunities, and child custody determinations.

    According to the ACLU’s original analysis, marijuana arrests now account for over half of all drug arrests in the United States. Nationwide, the arrest data revealed one consistent trend: significant racial bias. Despite roughly equal usage rates, Blacks are 4 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana. Most people arrested cannot afford a $500 bond levied upon them and are forced to remain in jail until a formal hearing, which is another tremendous cost to the taxpayer.

    There were 678 marijuana arrests in Jefferson County in 2016. That’s more than cocaine, meth and heroin combined. That doesn’t seem like a lot for Jefferson County but it doesn’t tell the whole picture. Even if the police just issue you a citation you still have a record and that record may follow you around for a long time. Defendants are forced into drug classes, which can be costly. There is subsequent drug testing, which is amazingly counterproductive as it incentivizes people to use spice, or opiates that are not detected as long.

    Frankfort has failed to advance cannabis legislation year after year. We are asking that Our Metro Council adopt an ordinance making cannabis possession the Lowest Law Enforcement Priority of the Louisville Metro Police Department. We believe your unified voice of approval will send a message to our mayor and to Frankfort. Please lead us as we are determined to end the war on medical and responsible cannabis consumers.

    SOURCE LINK

    legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300BELOW IS THE ORDINANCE AS WRITTEN:

    LOWEST LAW ENFORCEMENT PRIORITY ORDINANCE FOR CANNABIS POSSESSION

    We the people of Louisville ordain that investigations, citations, arrests, property seizures, and prosecutions for cannabis possession, cultivation or use in the Louisville metro area are the lowest law enforcement priority of the Louisville Metro Police Department. The Louisville Metro Council shall transmit notification of the enactment of this initiative to the state and federal elected officials who represent the city of Louisville, the Governor of Kentucky, The President of the United States of America and The Secretary General of the United Nations.

    Findings:

    (a) Current federal and state policies needlessly harm the citizens of Louisville. Numerous bills have been filed to remove criminal penalties for cannabis possession in the state legislature over the last five years and the Commonwealth has failed to act.

    (b) The Institute of Medicine has found that cannabis has medicinal value and is not a gateway drug. Evidence shows cannabis is actually an exit drug from alcohol and opiate addiction.

    (c) Cannabis is incorrectly scheduled and should be removed from federal scheduling.

    (d) Louisville should determine its cannabis policies locally and Metro Council would prefer to move away from incarceration. We believe a regulated market that allows adult possession and medical use for minors under a doctor’s care should replace the current failed policies.

    (e) Louisville Metro Council believes that current state laws punish medical patients unfairly and fail to reflect the reality of responsible adult use.

    (f) Louisville Metro Council believes sufficient evidence exists to conclude cannabis prohibition, especially through drug testing, creates a bias toward alcohol and more dangerous drugs. This bias has exacerbated prescription drug abuse and is casual to the creation/use of synthetic marijuana.

    (g) Law enforcement resources would be better spent fighting serious and violent crimes.

    (h) Decades of arresting millions of cannabis users have failed to control cannabis use or reduce its availability. Metro Council believes that a regulated market would be more effective than the current black market at limiting youth access.

    (i) Cannabis prohibition disproportionately affects low income and minority communities.

    Definitions:

    For the purposes of this chapter, the following words and phrases shall have the meanings respectively ascribed to them by this section:

    a) “Adult” means an individual who is 18 years of age or older.

    (b) “Louisville Metro law enforcement officer” means a member of the Louisville Metro Police Department or any other city agency or department that engages in law enforcement activity.

    (c) “Lowest law enforcement priority” means a priority such that all law enforcement activities related to all offenses other than adult, personal-use cannabis offenses shall be a higher priority than all law enforcement activities related to cannabis offenses, where the cannabis was intended for adult personal use, other than the exceptions designated in this chapter.

    (d) “Cannabis” means all parts of the cannabis plant, whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant, its seeds, or its resin.

    Directives:

    (a) Louisville Metro law enforcement officers shall make law enforcement activity relating to cannabis offenses, where the cannabis was intended for adult personal use, their lowest law enforcement priority. Law enforcement activities relating to cannabis offenses include, but are not limited to, investigation, citation, arrest, seizure of property, or providing assistance to the prosecution of adult cannabis offenses.

    (b) This lowest law enforcement priority policy shall not apply to use of cannabis on public property or driving under the influence.

    (c) This lowest law enforcement priority policy shall apply to cooperating with state or federal agents to arrest, cite, investigate, prosecute, or seize property from adults for cannabis offenses included in the lowest law enforcement priority policy.

    (d) Louisville Metro law enforcement officers shall not accept or renew formal deputation or commissioning by a federal law enforcement agency if such deputation or commissioning will include investigating, citing, arresting, or seizing property from adults for cannabis offenses included in the lowest law enforcement priority policy.

    (e) Louisville shall not accept any federal funding that would be used to investigate, cite, arrest, prosecute, or seize property from adults for cannabis offenses included in the lowest law enforcement priority policy. This shall not prevent Louisville from receiving any federal funding not used for purposes contrary to this chapter.

    Oversight:

    (a) The Louisville Metro Council shall ensure the timely implementation of this chapter by:

    (1) Designing, with consultation with the Louisville Metro Police Department, a supplemental report form for Louisville Metro law enforcement officers to use to report all adult cannabis arrests, citations, and property seizures and all instances of officers assisting in state or federal arrests, citations, and property seizures for any adult cannabis offenses. The supplemental report form shall be designed with the goal of allowing the Metro Council to ascertain whether the lowest law enforcement priority policy was followed;

    (2) Receiving grievances from individuals who believe they were subjected to law enforcement activity contrary to the lowest law enforcement priority policy;

    (3) Requesting additional information from any Louisville Metro law enforcement officer who engaged in law enforcement activity relating to one or more cannabis offenses under circumstances which appear to violate the lowest law enforcement priority policy. An officer’s decision not to provide additional information shall not be grounds for discipline; and

    (4) Reporting semi-annually on the implementation of this chapter, with the first report being issued nine months after the enactment of this chapter. These reports shall include but not necessarily be limited to: the number of all arrests, citations, property seizures, and prosecutions for cannabis offenses in Louisville; the breakdown of all cannabis arrests and citations by race, age, specific charge, and classification as infraction, misdemeanor, or felony; any instances of law enforcement activity that the Metro Council believes violated the lowest law enforcement priority policy; and the estimated time and money spent by the city on law enforcement and punishment for adult cannabis offenses. These reports shall be made with the cooperation of the County District Attorney’s Office, the Louisville Metro Police Department, and any other Louisville law enforcement agencies in providing needed data.

    (b) Louisville law enforcement officers shall submit to the Metro Council a supplemental report within seven calendar days after each adult cannabis arrest, citation, or property seizure or instance of assisting in a state or federal arrest, citation, or property seizure for any adult cannabis offense in Metro Louisville.

    Notifications:

    Beginning three months after the enactment of this chapter, the city clerk shall execute a mandatory and ministerial duty of sending letters on an annual basis to the Louisville’s U.S. Representative, both of Louisville’s U.S. Senators, Louisville’s Senators and Representative members in the Kentucky State Legislature, the Governor of Kentucky, the President of the United States and the UN Secretary-General. This letter shall state, “The citizens of Louisville, Kentucky have passed an initiative to de-prioritize adult cannabis offenses, where the cannabis is intended for personal adult use or medical use by minors under a doctor’s care, and we request that State, Federal and International governments take immediate steps to enact similar laws.” This duty shall be carried out until state, federal and international laws are changed accordingly.

    Enforceability; Severability:

    All sections of this chapter are mandatory. A violation of this chapter is not a criminal offense.

    If any provision of this chapter or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the chapter and the application of such provisions to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby.

    Received from Tom Rector Jr.

    ADDITIONALLY:

    Tom Rector Jr.

    Yesterday at 3:18 PM ·

    I applaud the the city for taking this step in diverting low-level drug offenses to treatment instead of jail. Our “no arrests for cannabis” ordinance we introduced fits perfectly with this harm reduction strategy. Louisville citizens who possess cannabis don’t need treatment unless other drugs are involved.

    I’m feeling really good about getting our cannabis ordinance passed, so come and support us tomorrow night Thursday at 6 p.m. 601 West Jefferson at the Louisville Metro Council meeting. We have three great speakers:

    Dan Seum
    Matthew Bratcher
    Sean Vandevander

    Join me and support these folks. Let’s get Kentucky’s two largest cities, Louisville and Lexington, to stop arresting people for cannabis BEFORE the 2019 KGA session!

    youtube.com

    Access Louisville: LEAD pilot program @LMPD @voamid @louisvillemayor @JeffCoAttyKY

    What is LEAD? LEAD is an is an innovative…

     
  • ShereeKrider 9:12 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dish Network, , , random drug testing, state   

    The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work. 


     

     

    pee-cup

     

    The Supreme Court of Colorado ruled unanimously last week that Dish Network acted lawfully when it fired a quadriplegic employee who used medicinal marijuana legally to control leg spasms and while he was not at work. The employee, Brandon Coats, was fired in 2010 when he failed a random drug test.

    Needless to say, this was not a popular decision among marijuana legalization activists. In his appeal, Coats claimed that Colorado labor laws legitimized his use of marijuana, making his firing illegal under those same laws. The court’s ruling held that the term “lawful activity” must be considered in both a federal and a state legal context. Because marijuana use remains illegal under federal law and marijuana itself is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, the fact that both the Congress and the Obama administration’s Justice Department have signaled that enforcement will be both lightly funded and lightly enforced does not supersede the law. Under federal law, marijuana is a dangerous and illegal drug and that is the end of the story, regardless of the feds’ “wink-wink-nod-nod” approach.

    At the Brookings Institution’s Fixgov blog, managing editor John Hudak noted:

    Federal efforts have limited funding for the use of enforcing medical marijuana laws (Congress) or use prosecutorial discretion to limit the enforcement of marijuana laws (Department of Justice). However, those moves do not resolve the serious disconnects in the law that extend far beyond a medical marijuana patient fearing prosecution. Inconsistencies between state and federal marijuana laws extend to issues of employment, housing, banking, property rights, and a variety of other areas

    We have noted before that the lack of a federal law — which only Congress can pass — raises any number of obstacles for companies in the marijuana industry. Dispensaries and growers cannot find bankers willing to take their cash deposits, and even a state government is having difficulty finding a willing bank. With almost half the states having approved the use of medical marijuana, perhaps it is time for Congress to fix a system that is truly broken.

    ALSO READ: The 10 Largest Marijuana Companies

    Read more: Congress Deserves Blame for Colorado Ruling Against Medical Marijuana – 24/7 Wall St. http://247wallst.com/consumer-products/2015/06/22/congress-deserves-blame-for-colorado-ruling-against-medical-marijuana/#ixzz3dpMMqgIa
    Follow us: @247wallst on Twitter | 247wallst on Facebook

     
  • ShereeKrider 1:50 am on February 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , state   

    Prohibition Repeal Is A Good Model For Marijuana Legalization 


    9:51 AM 12/05/2014

    Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market at the California Heritage Market in Los Angeles, California July 11, 2014.  REUTERS/David McNew

    Today is the 81st anniversary of the repeal of federal alcohol prohibition.

    The 21st Amendment ended the failed experiment of Prohibition and delegated the issue of alcohol legalization and regulation solely to the states.

    The 21st Amendment was neither “for” nor “against” alcohol. It was simply an acknowledgment that federal prohibition was an obvious failure and a nod towards state’s and individual rights. No state was required to legalize alcohol. It was their choice.

    The repeal of prohibition has been a tremendous success. This country has the best regulated beverage alcohol industry in the world while still being the world’s most dynamic. Just ask any beer drinker!

    Fast forward to the present. Republicans made huge gains in last month’s elections, decisively winning control of the Senate, increasing their dominance in the House to a level not seen since the 40’s, controlling 33 governorships and more state legislators than any time since the 1920s. They now have the opportunity to cement and expand these gains and to create a permanent majority.

    How? By leading the charge to end the federal prohibition of marijuana. You don’t have to be “pro-cannabis” to be against prohibition.

    Like it or not, illicit marijuana is available in every corner of this country. Any teenager can get it with little effort. Most say it’s far easier to get than beer.

    Criminal gangs across the country rake in tens of billions of dollars each year selling marijuana. Milton Friedman once said, “See, if you look at the drug war from a purely economic point of view, the role of the government is to protect the drug cartel. That’s literally true.”

    In 2012, 750,000 people were arrested for mere possession. That’s about one arrest every 48 seconds! And a disproportionate number of the people arrested on marijuana-related charges are minorities.

    The federal prohibition of marijuana has been as profound a failure as the attempted federal prohibition against alcohol. The solution is the same. Let the states decide and regulate as they see fit.

    Here in Colorado, the legalization of marijuana has been a resounding success. Teen use is down. Auto fatalities are at near historic lows. Crime is down across the board. Tax revenue is flowing in.

    If Republicans want to expand their base, they need to show they truly believe in a liberty-based agenda. Reach out to groups that historically have not been favorable to the Republican brand and prove through action that they have much more in common than they might think. Individual freedom is a winning message for people of all colors and all walks of life.

    Republicans in Congress should pass legislation within their first 60 days in office repealing federal prohibition and placing the issue with the individual states and their citizens.

    A statement such as, “I’m personally against it but believe in the wisdom of the people” can be a get-out-of-jail-free card for all who fear being branded pro-marijuana. The issue isn’t for or against marijuana but rather whether a legal, state regulated market is preferable to a prohibition market. Alcohol or marijuana, the answer to this is clear.

    The alternative is Republicans turning off another generation of voters who think of them as the party that speaks of individual freedom but whose actions suggest they want to control other people’s lives. These folks have seen the failure of big government and most big institutions. Their loyalty can be obtained, but the party has to walk the walk.

    Think I exaggerate? Here in Colorado, the Republican challenger for governor was ahead by 10 points in a September poll. Then, showing the Republican skill for snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, he stated he would like to recriminalize marijuana. His lead evaporated almost overnight.

    He lost by 58,000 votes and singlehandedly damaged the Republican brand for a generation of young Colorado voters. There are over 10,000 people directly employed in this Colorado industry and hundreds of thousands of consumers. That’s a lot of voters to antagonize; many of them motivated single issue folks.

    What if the GOP could create a new supporter every 48 seconds rather than trying to throw them in jail?

    Freedom and liberty win. Prohibition and attempting to control people’s lives loses. Republicans, if you believe what you say, end the federal prohibition on marijuana. A permanent majority awaits. It is yours for the taking.

    John Conlin is a self-employed management consultant providing services to beer, wine, and spirits distributors across the country. He is also in the process of starting a marijuana-infused edibles company.

     

    CONTINUE READING…

     

    Tags: John Conlin, Marijuana, Prohibition

     
  • ShereeKrider 12:02 am on March 8, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    Manipulating Marijuana’s Future In Kentucky

    http://www.kystandard.com/content/manipulating-marijuanas-future-kentucky

     
  • ShereeKrider 10:10 pm on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    The House Agriculture and Small Business Committee held a hearing Wednesday on two bills pending in the state Legislature that could put Kentucky in position to grow hemp if a federal restriction is lifted. Neither bill was called for a vote.
    http://www.lex18.com/news/lawmakers-promote-hemp-as-cash-crop-in-kentucky

     
  • ShereeKrider 7:42 pm on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    Despite the fact that marijuana remains a controlled substance that is illegal in the United States under federal law, 16 states and the District of Columbia have legalized “medical marijuana.” Del. Cheryl Glenn’s HB15, the “Maryland Medical Marijuana Act,” was introduced and first read on Jan. 11, the first day of this year’s General Assembly session. Two more bills calling for legalization of medical marijuana have been introduced since. We would like to make the case that medical marijuana, as currently “prescribed,” makes a farce of medicine

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-medical-marijuana-20120307,0,4436991.story

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:57 pm on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    A medical marijuana law was recently filed in the Kentucky Senate. Senate Bill 129, The Gatewood Galbraith Memorial Medical Marijuana Act, filed by Senator Perry Clark, will reschedule marijuana from Schedule I dangerous and having no medical value to Schedule II dangerous but having medical value so it can be prescribed by a doctor. The few articles that have appeared about it on the internet have expressed a tone of surprise that Kentucky would take this progressive step. It’s puzzling they are surprised because Kentucky, like California, has a reputation for growing some of the best domestic marijuana in the nation, perhaps in the world. Indeed, Kentucky had a large hemp industry before prohibition killed it. I remember reading a newspaper article in the Seventies, about marijuana growing up out of the cracks in the sidewalk near the old hemp warehouses in Frankfort. Hemp/marijuana is no stranger to Kentucky.
    http://www.state-journal.com/news/simple_article/5158998?page=0

     
  • ShereeKrider 3:56 pm on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    Kentucky’s Governor is interested in programs and policies that would bring down the horrific cancer rate of the Bluegrass State. Currently , according to an article that appeared it the 29 Feb 2012 edition of the Kentucky Enquirer, the state sees more than 24,000 cases of cancer each year. Around 9,500 Kentuckians die from cancer every year. Kentucky’s lung cancer rate is 49% higher than the other states and we have one of the highest colon and rectal cancer death rates in the nation.
    http://www.state-journal.com/news/simple_article/5164726

     
  • ShereeKrider 4:49 am on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    SB 129 Medical marijuana, Legislative Concerns

    http://www.state-journal.com/news/simple_article/5162613

     
  • ShereeKrider 4:49 am on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , state   


    Kentucky’s Cancer Fight Needs This Weapon

    http://www.state-journal.com/news/simple_article/5164726

     
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